big league

(redirected from big leaguer)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

big league

An area of tough competition and high rewards; the largest or foremost of its kind. For example, Winning an Oscar put this unknown actress in the big league. The term alludes to the major (big) leagues of American baseball. [Late 1800s] Also see big time, def. 2.
See also: big, league

big league

1. n. a situation where competition is keen and a high level of performance is expected. (Usually plural. Referred originally to major league sports.) You’re in the big leagues now—no more penny-ante stuff.
2. and big-league mod. professional; big time. (From baseball.) When I’m a big-league star, I’ll send you free tickets.
See also: big, league
References in periodicals archive ?
The manager added that it was a happy occasion to greet someone like Bailey as a big leaguer after having had the duty to relay bad news to players going the other way.
But he said he never will forget the first time he saw it as a big leaguer Friday.
com host Seth Everett and former Big Leaguer Darryl Hamilton look back at the day's events and update fans on the trades as the deadline expires.
The famed big leaguer conducted two clinics today at the Boys & Girls Club in Pawtucket.
Over a two-day period their dream of getting a chance to one day become a big leaguer becomes a reality for this talented group of athletes.
Pierre was a big leaguer, giving Figgins something to shoot for while they pushed each other through offseason workouts.
Sajak, a life-long Chicago Cubs fanatic, has teamed with MLB Radio regular and former nine-season big leaguer, Billy Sample, to bring his substantial baseball knowledge to the new baseball and entertainment themed radio show.
That's part of the fun, says former Big Leaguer Jim Bouton, who wrote the Foreword.
I want to be a big leaguer, and he knows what it's like.
No big leaguer could have felt any more emotion than I did at that very moment.
Gierhart, this is in part because of the success Major League Baseball has had in converting fall leaguers to big leaguers.
It produced three solid big leaguers in Shea Hillenbrand, Adam Everett and David Eckstein.
Lee topped our list, and three of the top five spots on our highest-paid Arkansans list went to big leaguers.
The proportion of minor leaguers who are Latinos is even higher (42 percent, according to ESPN), suggesting this particular pipeline of talent will continue to pump in big leaguers for years to come.