beyond one's means


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beyond one's means

Too costly for one, more than one can afford. For example, A second vacation this year is well beyond our means. The noun means here signifies "resources at one's disposal," a usage current since Shakespeare's time, as in Measure for Measure (2:2): "Let her have needful, but not lavish means." [Late 1800s]
See also: beyond, mean
References in periodicals archive ?
Steve Albrecht Study on the mind of a fraudster, Ballard stated that research shows nine motivators of fraud: 1) living beyond one's means, 2) an overwhelming desire for personal gain, 3) high personal debt, 4) close association with customers, 5) a feeling that one's pay is not commensurate with one's responsibilities, 6) a "wheeler-dealer" attitude, 7) a strong challenge to beat the system, 8) excessive gambling habit and 9) undue family or peer pressure.
But the temptation to spend beyond one's means can be big in our society, where much emphasis is placed on material possessions.
Valis tells her readers that Galdos saw living on credit beyond one's means as a form of cursileria because it represents aspirations and desires without the means to fulfill them.
Even if a magnanimous gift was a reckless expenditure beyond one's means, it must be given with grace, for acts of prestations reflected and reinforced the Elizabethan social hierarchy.
The two most common traits are a tendency to live beyond one's means, and a struggle with financial difficulties.
It is largely due to mismanagement of finances and living beyond one's means for prestige in the society," he reckons.
The credit crisis in Greece is the most recent of a growing number of reminders about the dangers of spending beyond one's means.