a bit beyond (one's) ken

(redirected from beyond his ken)
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

a bit beyond (one's) ken

Advanced beyond one's ability to understand or make sense of the subject matter or task at hand. The stuff they're teaching in this advanced math class is a bit beyond my ken.
See also: beyond, bit, ken
References in classic literature ?
Red-bearded it was, and red-haired, but even in dried death there was an ironness of feature and a massive brow that hinted to him of mastery of secrets beyond his ken.
He said it simply--somebody somewhere ought to have stopped something, but who or how or why were all beyond his ken.
The little pile of bones in the rude cradle, fashioned with such loving care by the former Lord Greystoke, meant nothing to him-- that one day that little skull was to help prove his right to a proud title was as far beyond his ken as the satellites of the suns of Orion.
Similarly, it is beyond his ken to see that, although football remains a male dominated world, women can take a break from baking buns to enjoy the game and even make a career from it.
Such rural concerns as inflated housing costs and the closure of cottage hospitals, post offices and schools are beyond his ken.
FEW trainers have their yard in such good form as Henry Cecil, and although the master of Warren Place is more associated with winning Classics, Newmarket's Coral Sprint Handicap is not beyond his ken.
What we are witnessing is Sigmar's transformation into an artist, a creative writer who invents a world beyond his ken.
He can play earthy and passionate just fine, but detached, intelligent efficiency is beyond his ken.
In his brilliant study of cultural differences that resonate in texts treating of dogma and religious diversity, Terence Cave asks us to put ourselves in the place of either Alcofribas Nasier, the narrator of Pantagruel, wandering over the mountains and lands in his master's mouth (the source of the episode belongs to Folengo), who meets a cabbage planter tending to his crops, or Montaigne, in his report of an encounter he had with native Americans in Rouen, who confers with naked friends from worlds beyond his ken.