better of

*better of someone

 and *the best of someone
triumph over someone. (*Typically: get ~; have ~.) Bill got the best of John in the boxing match. I tried to get the better of Tom in the golf match, but he won anyway.
See also: better, of
References in classic literature ?
Now, well would it have been for him who had first spoken had he left Robin Hood alone; but his anger was hot, both because the youth had gotten the better of him and because of the deep draughts of ale that he had been quaffing.
Now think better of what we have just been speaking of; and don't be rash, there's a good fellow
I understand you, brother,' replies the lady very smartly; 'you suppose I have the money, and want the beauty; but as times go now, the first will do without the last, so I have the better of my neighbours.
When John comes back, and I see them together, I can judge better of her feelings toward him.
But to-day it was clear that the good principle was triumphant: this affair of the water-power had been a tangled business somehow, for all it seemed--look at it one way--as plain as water's water; but, big a puzzle as it was, it hadn't got the better of Riley.
I hope you will think better of their looks tomorrow; for I assure you Mr.
To own the truth, Henry and I were partly driven out this very evening by a disappointment about a green goose, which he could not get the better of.
In the discussions that arose between the brothers on their views of the peasantry, Sergey Ivanovitch always got the better of his brother, precisely because Sergey Ivanovitch had definite ideas about the peasant--his character, his qualities, and his tastes.
Full browser ?