bent


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bent cop

A police officer who is corrupt, takes bribes, or abuses the privileges and powers of his or her position. The gangs are a problem, but it's the bent cops you really have to watch out for. I know a bent cop working down at the station. If we slip him a few hundred dollars, this charge might go away.
See also: bent, cop

bent double

Bent over at the waist. I was bent double for nearly half an hour after he punched me in the stomach.
See also: bent, double

bent on a splice

An older sailing phrase meaning about to or intending to get married. "Bent" in this context means determined or set (on a course of action), and "splice" refers to two ropes that have been joined to create a single, larger one. I can't wait for this voyage to be over, for I'm bent on a splice to my lady as soon as we reach home.
See also: bent, on, splice

get bent

An exclamation of dismissal, anger, annoyance, or exasperation toward someone or in response to what he or she is saying. A: "I need to borrow $50 for my rent this month." B: "Get bent! You still owe me $100 from last month!" You're such a jerk sometimes, why don't you just get bent!
See also: bent, get

as the twig is bent, so is the tree inclined

One's actions as an adult are dictated by behaviors learned in childhood. I can't believe she still doesn't listen to other people. I guess it's true that as the twig is bent, so is the tree inclined.
See also: inclined, tree

be hell-bent on

To be very determined to do something, perhaps annoyingly so. She's hell-bent on coming here for Thanksgiving, so we better clean the guest room. I'm hell-bent on getting an A on this exam, so I've been studying all week.
See also: on

bend back

1. (of a person) To lean backwards. I bent back to catch my dog before he sprinted past me through the open door. I bent back to pick up all the socks I'd dropped on my way down the hall.
2. (of a thing) To push backwards. A noun can be used between "bend" and "back" or after "back." If you bend those curtains back, this room will get a lot more sunlight. Bend back the corner of the page to mark your place in the book.
See also: back, bend

bend before (something)

To be pushed by something, usually the wind. As soon as I hung the sheets on the clothesline, they bent before the wind.
See also: before, bend

bend down

1. (of a person) To lean down or squat. I bent down to get my son's ball out from under the porch. I think I hurt my back when I bent down to pick up those boxes.
2. (of a thing) To lean closer to the ground. The way that shed is bending down makes me nervous that it will collapse soon.
See also: bend, down

bend (one's/the) elbow

To drink alcohol, perhaps excessively. Come bend your elbow at the bar with us tonight! If you're this hung-over, you must have really bent the elbow at the party last night.
See also: bend, elbow

bend forward

To lean in a forward direction. OK, everyone, now bend forward and touch your toes.
See also: bend, forward

bend in

To lean or arch inward. Ever since the car accident, my passenger-side door has been bent in.
See also: bend

bent out of shape

1. (of a person) Upset or angry. Don't get all bent out of shape—I'm sure she didn't mean to insult you. You should apologize to Phil before he gets bent out of shape.
2. (of an object) Misshapen or misaligned. Ever since the car accident, my passenger-side door has been bent out of shape.
See also: bent, of, out, shape

bend over

To bend at one's waist. OK, everyone, now bend over and touch your toes. I think I hurt my back when I bent over to pick up those boxes.
See also: bend

bend over backwards

1. Literally, to lean backwards. I'm so sore after bending over backwards and doing all those weird stretches at yoga this morning.
2. To exert a lot of effort towards some end. This phrase is often used to express frustration when one's efforts go unrecognized. I have been bending over backwards to make sure that you have a wonderful visit, and you don't even care! The entire staff really needs to bend over backwards while the CEO is visiting our office.
See also: backward, bend

bend the law

To do something that does not break the law but could be considered inappropriate or unfair. A: "Come on, a little bit of speeding is just bending the law." B: "Yeah, I think a police officer would disagree with that." They can't arrest me for just bending the law!
See also: bend, law

bend the rules

To do something that is usually prohibited. You're not supposed to have sweets when you get home from school, but I guess we can bend the rules a little.
See also: bend, rule

bent on (doing something)

Very determined to do something, perhaps aggravatingly so. She's bent on coming here for the weekend, so we better clean the guest room. I'm bent on getting an A on this exam, so I've been studying all week.
See also: bent, on

As the twig is bent, so is the tree inclined.

Prov. A grown person will act the way he or she was taught to act as a child. Alice's parents thought it was cute when she threw tantrums, and you'll notice that she still throws tantrums now that she's grown up. As the twig is bent, so is the tree inclined. Don't encourage your son to be so greedy. As the twig is bent, so is the tree inclined.
See also: inclined, tree

bend back

to lean or bend backwards. He bent back to pick up the book, and he fell. When she bent back, she ripped something.
See also: back, bend

bend down

to curve downward; [for someone] to lean down. Please bend down and pick up the little bits of paper you just dropped. The snow-laden bushes bent down.
See also: bend, down

bend forward

to lean forward; to curve forward. The tree bent forward in the wind. I bent forward to pick up the pencil.
See also: bend, forward

bend in

to curve or turn inward. The shore bent in about a mile to the west. The side of the shed bent in under the force of the wind.
See also: bend

bend over

[for someone] to bend down at the waist. I bent over and picked up the coin. When he bent over, something ripped.
See also: bend

bend over backwards

(to do something) Go to fall over backwards (to do something).
See also: backward, bend

bend over backwards (to do something) (for someone)

Fig. to work very hard to accomplish something for someone; to go out of one's way (to do something) (for someone). He will bend over backwards to help you. I bent over backwards for you, and you showed no thanks!
See also: backward, bend

bend someone or something back

to curve or arch someone or something backward. We bent the child back a little so we could examine the spider bite. Ouch! Don't bend back my hand! Bend the branch back so we can get a better view.
See also: back, bend

bend the law

 and bend the rules
Fig. to cheat a little bit without breaking the law. (Jocular.) I didn't break the rules. I just bent the rules a little. Nobody ever got arrested for bending the law.
See also: bend, law

bent on doing something

Fig. determined to do something. I believe you are bent on destroying the entire country. I am bent on saving the planet.
See also: bent, doing, on

bent out of shape

 
1. Fig. angry; insulted. Man, there is no reason to get so bent out of shape. I didn't mean any harm. I got bent out of shape because of the way I was treated.
2. intoxicated by alcohol or drugs. I was so bent out of shape I thought I'd never recover. I've been polluted, but never as bent out of shape as this.
See also: bent, of, out, shape

hell-bent for leather

Inf. moving or behaving recklessly; riding a horse fast and recklessly. They took off after the horse thief, riding hell-bent for leather. Here comes the boss. She's not just angry; she's hell-bent for leather.
See also: leather

hell-bent for

(somewhere or something) Fig. riding or drive somewhere very fast or recklessly. Fred sped along, hellbent for home, barely missing another car.

bend over backwards

to try very hard lean over backwards We want your business and will bend over backwards to keep it.
Usage notes: usually used to describe efforts to help or please someone
Related vocabulary: fall all over yourself (to do something)
See also: backward, bend

bent on something

determined to do something He was bent on quitting that job even though he was making a lot of money.
See also: bent, on

bend the rules

to allow something to be done that is not usually allowed We don't usually let students take books home, but I'll bend the rules this time.
See also: bend, rule

bent out of shape

very angry or upset My boss ignored my comments, but I don't feel that it's worth getting all bent out of shape over it.
See also: bent, of, out, shape

bend/lean over backwards to do something

  (British, American & Australian) also fall over backwards to do something (Australian)
to try very hard to do something, especially to help or please someone else Banks are bending over backwards to help those in difficulties.
See know backwards
See also: backward, bend

get bent out of shape

  (American informal)
to become very angry or upset It's ok, don't worry about returning the books. I don't get bent out of shape about things like that.
See also: bent, get, of, out, shape

be hell-bent on something/doing something

to be determined to do something, usually something that people think is wrong Local fans seemed hell-bent on causing as much trouble as possible during the match.
See also: on

bend/stretch the rules

to do something or to allow someone to do something which is not usually allowed We don't usually let students take books away, but I'm willing to bend the rules on this occasion.
See also: bend, rule

bend over backwards

Also, lean over backwards. Exert oneself to the fullest extent, as in Dad bent over backwards so as not to embarrass Stasia's new boyfriend. This phrase transfers the gymnastic feat of a backbend to taking a great deal of trouble for someone or something. [c. 1920] Also see under fall all over.
See also: backward, bend

bent on

Also, bent upon. Determined, resolved, as in Jamie is bent on winning the math prize. This phrase, first recorded in 1762, always uses the past participle of the verb bend in the sense of "tend toward."
See also: bent, on

bent out of shape

1. Infuriated, annoyed, as in Don't let Paul get you bent out of shape-calm down.
2. Shocked, astonished, as in That conservative audience was bent out of shape by his speech. [Slang; second half of 1900s] Also see in good condition (shape).
See also: bent, of, out, shape

hell-bent for leather

Moving recklessly fast, as in Out the door she went, hell-bent for leather. The use of hell-bent in the sense of "recklessly determined" dates from the first half of the 1800s. Leather alludes to a horse's saddle and to riding on horseback; this colloquial expression may be an American version of the earlier British army jargon hell for leather, first recorded in 1889.
See also: leather

bend the law

tv. to cheat a little bit without breaking the law. (Jocular.) I didn’t break the law. I just bent the law a little.
See also: bend, law

bent

1. mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. I’ve never seen two guys so bent.
2. mod. dishonest; crooked. I’m afraid that Paul is a little bent. He cheats on his taxes.
3. mod. angry. He was so bent there was steam coming out of his ears.

bent out of shape

1. mod. angry; insulted. Man, there is no reason to get so bent out of shape. I didn’t mean any harm.
2. n. alcohol or drug intoxicated. I was so bent out of shape I thought I’d never recover.
See also: bent, of, out, shape

kinky

and bent and twisted
1. mod. having to do with someone or something strange or weird. The guy is so kinky that everyone avoids him.
2. mod. having to do with unconventional sexual acts or people who perform them. She seems to have a morbid interest in kinky stuff.

bent

verb
See kinky

hell-bent for leather

Moving rapidly and with determination. “Hell” in this case strengthens the word “bent,” which means a direct route (although it sounds as though it should mean the opposite). “Leather” refers either to a saddle or to a whip used to urge a horse to move faster, or perhaps items. “Hell for leather” meaning “all deliberate haste” was a popular phrase in itself. Among a number of variants is “hell-bent for election,” said to have originated with the 1840 Maine gubernatorial race and appearing in an 1899 Stephen Crane story: “One puncher racin' his cow-pony hell-bent-for-election down Main Street.” Others are “hell-bent for breakfast,” “for Sunday,” and “for Georgia.”
See also: leather
References in periodicals archive ?
Bent and her team of engineers are devising ways to modify how the iris cells cluster on the surface of the lens capsule tissue using some of the same techniques used to make patterns on a computer chip.
Bent Glass Design and SPD Systems are jointly displaying products at the International Boatbuilders' Exhibition & Conference (IBEX) in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, which started on February 5th and runs until the 7th.
We had been talking with several vendors who proposed frame relay networks for us, but were instantly impressed when SAVVIS demonstrated how their doorstep-to-doorstep ATM solution was unmatched for security, reliability and speed," said Bob Newman, director of Network Service for Bent Pencil.
Steroid creams certainly can be used for eczema, but only when administered by a doctor who can prescribe doses that are not dangerously high and for limited periods," said Bent, who wrote a commentary that accompanies the study in WJM.
VCUP-fmSyH4) Apple To Replace Bent iPhone 6 & iPhone 6 Plus
during bending in bend increases spherical stress tensor component and also increases formability of bent material.
bending of softened timber to the required shape and restraining the bent components before drying and conditioning, and
Just slip the right tip over the bent pin and gently, carefully, bend it back in shape.
To take off smoothly and maintain rhythm and balance, the athlete must place more emphasis on lifting the lead leg with a slightly bent knee (Photos 1-2) than on "pushing off the ground.
To accomplish this, the knees are again slightly bent and the toes are aligned with each other as in sous-sus on pointe.
Just like Barbie's legs, the fingers stay bent until the owner straightens them again.
The week before Bent began to circulate in media screening rooms, a dissonant chorus of Orthodox rabbis raised their voices in protest of a Holocaust museum about to open in New York City.
In the first phase, the sensor is pushed automatically against the workpiece to be bent, close to the die.
If the penis is abnormally bumped or bent, an area where the septum attaches to the elastic fibers may stretch beyond a limit, injuring the lining of the erectile chamber and, for example, rupturing small blood vessels.
In a series of tests, the scientists rolled, twisted, and bent the devices as much as 90[degrees] Yet they kept on working.