belting

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belt a drink down

To drink something, often an alcoholic beverage, quickly. He belted a drink down and ordered another before we'd gotten three steps away from the bar.
See also: belt, down, drink

belt down (something or someone)

1. To anchor or fasten something or someone in place. You need to belt down the shed in the backyard before the big storm. Can you please belt down the baby in her highchair?
2. To drink something, often an alcoholic beverage, quickly. He belted down a drink and ordered another before we'd gotten three steps away from the bar.
See also: belt, down

belt out

1. To sing or talk loudly or forcefully. A noun can be used between "belt" and "out." I was amazed when that young girl walked into the audition and flawlessly belted out a Whitney Houston song without the slightest hesitation. The security guard belted instructions out at us as we pulled into the parking lot.
2. To strike someone violently. I belted out the intruder with a baseball bat, and he was still unconscious when the police arrived.
See also: belt, out

belt the grape

To get drunk, especially on wine. Based on all the empty wine bottles, I'm guessing you guys really belted the grape last night.
See also: belt, grape

belt up

To anchor or fasten someone in place, as with a seatbelt in a vehicle. A pronoun or the name of the person can be used between "belt" and "up" or after "up." OK, the kids are belted up—let's hit the road! Can you please belt the baby up in her highchair?
See also: belt, up

belt a drink down

Fig. to drink an alcoholic drink rapidly. (See also belt someone or something down.) She belted a couple of drinks down and went out to face her guests. How many drinks did Gloria belt down?
See also: belt, down, drink

belt someone up

to secure someone with a belt, such as a seat belt in a car. I had to belt her up because the seat belt was so complicated. We belted up the kids securely.
See also: belt, up

belt something out

Fig. to sing or play a song loudly and with spirit. When she's playing the piano, she really belts the music out. She really knows how to belt out a song.
See also: belt, out

belt the grape

Sl. to drink wine or liquor heavily and become intoxicated. He has a tendency to belt the grape—every afternoon after work. She's been belting the grape more than her husband wants.
See also: belt, grape

belt out

1. Knock unconscious; beat up, trounce; murder. For example, The police officer was accused of belting out the teenager before taking him to the station , or The hold-up man belted out the storekeeper and fled with the money. This expression originated in boxing. [Slang; c. 1940]
2. Sing or play music very loudly, as in She belted out the national anthem before every game. [Colloquial; c. 1950]
See also: belt, out

belt out

v.
To sing or shout something loudly and forcefully: The singer belted out the national anthem before the baseball game. He belted his story out so that everyone in the large room could hear him.
See also: belt, out

belt the grape

tv. to drink wine or liquor heavily and become intoxicated. He has a tendency to belt the grape—twenty-four hours a day.
See also: belt, grape