bed blocker


Also found in: Medical.

bed blocker

A derogatory term for a person in a hospital, typically an older patient, who is unable to live alone but no longer needs hospital treatment, thus occupying a bed that more needy patients might otherwise use. Primarily heard in UK. The nursing staff is starting to gripe about all the bed blockers.
See also: bed
References in periodicals archive ?
DELAYED discharge patients are taking up 430 beds in Dublin hospitals, forcing the bed blocker issue to crisis point.
But behind every bed blocker is a human being - a mother or father or grandparent; a person who might have fought in world wars; raised kids; probably lived their life with a work ethic that has since well and truly disap-peared from our society.
It's a problem that been with us for decades and my experience in hospital in recent years was that there was nearly always a bed blocker in a bay of six beds.
Mrs Wiseman will no doubt become a bed blocker in the not-too-distant future, yet if she had a home carer she in the first place would never have been in such a condition to warrant a hospital admission.
No one becomes a bed blocker voluntarily and I would have hoped the Echo should have a deeper understanding of the situation.
The Sandwell and West Birmingham Trust, which runs City Hospital and Sandwell Hospital, also forked out PS2,223,000 in March 2013- 14 due to bed blockers.
The one-time Apprentice contestant added she had had emails from nurses about bed blockers, which she said meant "people that are dumped in hospital".
At the height of pressure at the trust, there were 45 bed blockers in just one day.
The rise in the number of patients stuck in hospital unnecessarily, or so-called bed blockers, was revealed in official NHS figures.
This is particularly true of elderly people, who are often referred to as bed blockers as if they were deliberately trying to prevent someone else from getting treatment.
In the eight years after 1985/86, patient days accounted for by people staying over 60 days in acute care beds were cut by nearly half; overall, from 1969 to 1993/94, use by bed blockers fell by over 60 percent.
Now the hospital has said much of the difficulty has been caused by bed blockers - patients who are well enough to leave, but who have no care plan for their return to the community.
The largest number of bed blockers is among the nine hospitals run by the Cardiff and Vale NHS Trust which has remained constant at between 110 to 120 each month for the past year.
The rise in the number of patients stuck in hospital unnecessarily, or socalled bed blockers, was revealed in official NHS figures.
We were called bed blockers now we will be called job blockers