beat down

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beat down

1. To exhaust or discourage someone. In this usage, a person's name or pronoun is used between "beat" and "down." The long winters here just beat me down. I miss the warmth of the sun! I think working three jobs has finally beaten Alicia down—all she does these days is come home and sleep.
2. To strike someone or something repeatedly. That bully is always beating down on the smaller kids in our class. Just yesterday, he gave Joey a bloody nose. The rain has been beating down on our roof for hours, and I'm starting to worry that we'll have a leak.
3. To strike something so violently as to cause its collapse. In this usage, a noun can be used between "beat" and "down." I'm coming! Geez, you're going to beat the door down!
4. To strike something repeatedly in order to flatten it. That chicken needs to be thinner before we add the bread crumbs, so beat down on it some more.
See also: beat, down

beat someone down

Fig. to defeat or demoralize someone. The constant bombing finally beat them down. The attackers beat down the defenders.
See also: beat, down

beat something down

 
1. to break something in; to break through something. Don't beat the door down! I'm coming! Please don't beat down the door!
2. to flatten something. Sam beat the veal down to the thickness of a half an inch. First you beat down the meat to a very thin layer.
See also: beat, down

beat down (on someone or something)

to fall on someone or something. The rain beat down on us for an hour. The rock slide beat down on the car and totally ruined the body.
See also: beat, down

beat down

1. Force or drive down; defeat or subdue. For example, "And finally to beat down Satan under our feet" ( The Book of Common Prayer, 1552). [c. 1400]
2. Strike violently, as in the The sun kept beating down on us all day long. [Mid-1800s]
3. beat someone down. Make someone lower a price, as in He's always trying to beat us down. Economist Jeremy Bentham used this idiom in 1793: "Thus monopoly will beat down prices." [Slang; late 1700s]
See also: beat, down

beat down

v.
1. To hit something until it falls down: The police beat down the door of the suspect's house. They approached the crumbling wall and beat it down with their bare hands.
2. To defeat or demoralize someone: The constant criticism beat me down, and it was hard for me to try again. The invaders beat down every village they passed through.
3. To fall down steadily and heavily: The rain beat down on the roof.
4. To persuade someone to reduce the price of something: The clerk wanted $40 for the shoes but I beat him down to $30.
See also: beat, down
References in classic literature ?
If they think they can beat us down to our knees, let'em go ahead an' try it, that's all.
If we play like we did that day then they will beat us down there.
Last time Saints came here they beat us down at Cas.
Wigan beat us down here (in Cardiff) and I don't want them to have a double over us.
Wigan beat us down here (in Cardiff ) and I don't want them to have a double over us.
Team manager George English said: "If our League Cup matches had been in the Cup then we would have gone out of the competition by only two points as they beat us down there by 53-37, signifying how close were are in terms of team strength.
You see, ladies and gentlemen, we have let magazine publishers and advertisers beat us down for too long.
They beat us down there in the Championship last season so there's going to be a score to settle, but we're playing well are full of confidence so there is no reason we can't go there and get three points.
Bogie said: "Alfreton beat us down at their place in the cup, but tonight there are three points at stake and we have home advantage.
When they beat us down here we were all very disappointed and they celebrated quite hard, which added a little bit more an edge to it," he said.
Away from home they beat us in the Carling Cup last year and they beat us down there in the league.
From generation to generation we felt the scourges of narrow mindedness that beat us down to the point where we found comfort in self-hate.
Even when they beat us down there, he wasn't the one that killed us.
We play some great football and they will be looking to catch us and beat us down.
Australia will leave for Melbourne tomorrow to prepare for Sunday's clash at the TelstraDome and hooker Cameron Smith warned: "It's a tough ask against the Pommies - they're a great team and beat us down here a couple of years ago.