beat a path to someone's door

beat a path to someone's door

Come to someone in great numbers, as in Ever since she appeared on television, agents have been beating a path to her door. The term beat a path alludes to the trampling action of many feet. [Late 1500s]
See also: beat, door, path

beat a path to someone's door

If people beat a path to someone's door, they are eager to talk to that person or do business with them. Business leaders should be beating a path to Mr Eggar's door demanding that tough environmental laws be passed. Fashion editors now beat a path to Mugler's door and thousands of followers flock to get into one of his events. Note: This expression has been attributed to the American writer Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-82), who used similar words in a lecture: `If a man write a better book, preach a better sermon, or make a better mousetrap than his neighbour, 'tho he build his house in the woods, the world will make a beaten path to his door.'
See also: beat, door, path

beat a path to someone's door

(of a large number of people) hasten to make contact with someone regarded as interesting or inspiring.
This phrase developed from the idea of a large number of people trampling down vegetation to make a path: compare with off the beaten track (at beaten).
See also: beat, door, path