bear the brunt (of something)

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bear the brunt (of something)

To suffer the worst part of an unpleasant or problematic situation. When our system crashed, the call center employees bore the brunt of our customers' anger. Because I came home late, my sister bore the brunt of our mother's frustration about her job.
See also: bear, brunt

bear the brunt (of something)

to withstand the worst part or the strongest part of something, such as an attack. I had to bear the brunt of her screaming and yelling. Why don't you talk with her the next time she complains? I'm tired of bearing the brunt of her objections.
See also: bear, brunt

bear the brunt

Put up with the worst of some bad circumstance, as in It was the secretary who had to bear the brunt of the doctor's anger. This idiom uses brunt in the sense of "the main force of an enemy's attack," which was sustained by the front lines of the defenders. [Second half of 1700s]
See also: bear, brunt
References in classic literature ?
The revelation about the money must be made the very next morning; and if he withheld the rest, Dunstan would be sure to come back shortly, and, finding that he must bear the brunt of his father's anger, would tell the whole story out of spite, even though he had nothing to gain by it.
Hiram intended to accompany the officer as a spectator, but he felt no very strong desire to bear the brunt of the battle.
I see not one of them here; they cower as hounds before a lion; it is we, your allies, who bear the brunt of the battle.
Half an hour or more was allowed to elapse between the setting out of the horns or wings of the army before any stir was made by the Greys and their supporting regiment, known as the Buffaloes, which formed its chest, and were destined to bear the brunt of the battle.
Mushahidullah said boosting adaptation in climate-sensitive agriculture, water, livestock, fisheries and forest sectors in the Asia-Pacific region, which is home to two-third of the worlds total extremely poor people, has become indispensable to abate economic inequality as mostly the poor bear the brunt of natural disasters.
Summary: Commuters from one county will bear the brunt of the new year rail fare rises, with some season tickets rising more than six per cent.
A survey by insolvency trade body R3 shows that almost half of its members believe the construction sector will bear the brunt of the public sector cutbacks next year.
Too often on a Friday and Saturday night, the police and local A&E departments bear the brunt of some of the worst excesses of binge drinking and alcohol-fuelled crime and disorder.
TROUBLED housebuilder Persimmon today announced that the Midlands will bear the brunt of its job losses programme.
The very poor people that Oxfam works with will bear the brunt of these disasters.
Expecting car-makers and consumers to bear the brunt of the new regulations will be like flushing the UK motor industry down the loo with one pull of the chain.
The pastor of my church, Father Richard Zanotti at Holy Rosary, saw my fellow parishioners, many struggling to advance into the middle class, bear the brunt of the landfill's pollution.
There is no arguing that the troops on the ground bear the brunt of Bush's Iraq policy, but regarding accountability for that policy, doesn't the buck stop with the president?
They are finding ways to compensate potentially skyrocketing material prices that may deter subcontractors from bidding on jobs, Kildare said, explaining that developers must be willing to adopt new methods to encourage contractors to bid on their projects, and determine who should bear the brunt of the risk fronting money for materials.
STEVE WATSON insists West Brom's players and not boss Bryan Robson should bear the brunt of the flak for relegation.