bear in mind that

bear in mind that...

to remember [something]; to consider [something]. Bear in mind that the trip will be expensive. I asked the teacher to bear in mind that I am just a beginner.
See also: bear, mind
References in classic literature ?
The public are entreated to bear in mind that thirteen years have passed since it was finished, many more since it was begun, and that during that period, places, manners, books, and opinions have undergone considerable changes.
IN THE FIRST PLACE PLEASE BEAR IN MIND THAT I do not expect you to believe this story.
You must bear in mind that for some time past I have been in terrible distress--that for a whole month I have been, so to speak, hanging by a single thread.
It is, however, far more necessary to bear in mind that there are many unknown laws of correlation of growth, which, when one part of the organisation is modified through variation, and the modifications are accumulated by natural selection for the good of the being, will cause other modifications, often of the most unexpected nature.
He entreated her to bear in mind that the disclosures of the afternoon were strictly confidential.
In pursuing this inquiry, we must bear in mind that we are not to confine our view to the present period, but to look forward to remote futurity.
But bear in mind that you will be shot if you make a single move to attack me or any other aboard the ship.
If this seems rather a hasty answer to make, before I knew what the favor was, might I ask you to bear in mind that Mrs.
I don't mean to pretend that the science of gunnery has not advanced, but it is as well to bear in mind that during the middle ages they obtained results more surprising, I will venture to say, than ours.
After glancing at herself as a comparatively worthless vessel, but still as one of some desert, she besought her to bear in mind that her aforesaid dear and only mother was of a weakly constitution and excitable temperament, who had constantly to sustain afflictions in domestic life, compared with which thieves and robbers were as nothing, and yet never sunk down or gave way to despair or wrath, but, in prize-fighting phraseology, always came up to time with a cheerful countenance, and went in to win as if nothing had happened.
Vanstone's character which I am now about to present to you seems in some respects at variance with your later experience, bear in mind that, when you first knew him twelve years since, he was a man of forty; and that, when I first knew him, he was a lad of nineteen.
Besides, you must bear in mind that, knowing it to be your Childish Nature to tell all that's in your heart--so simple
You should bear in mind that I hinna your cleverness' (they were constantly giving each other little knocks).