beam

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beam with pride

To smile broadly and radiantly due to pride in something or someone. I was simply beaming with pride when my son was awarded his college diploma.
See also: beam, pride

broad across the beam

Of a person (typically female), having a large buttocks and/or thighs. A derogatory term, it refers to ships that have a wide breadth across. All the holiday eating always leaves me a bit broad across the beam!
See also: across, beam, broad

on (one's) beam-ends

In a precarious and/or desperate situation. The phrase was originally used to describe the tilted position of a ship before it capsizes. My sister's on her beam-ends now that she's lost her job—I might have to lend her some money so she doesn't lose her house. Tell me the truth, doc—am I on my beam-ends, or do I still have treatment options available?
See also: on

on the beam-ends

In a precarious and/or desperate situation. The phrase was originally used to describe the tilted position of a ship before it capsizes. My sister's on the beam-ends now that she's lost her job—I might have to lend her some money so she doesn't lose her house. Tell me the truth, doc—am I on the beam-ends, or do I still have treatment options available?
See also: on

be broad in the beam

1. (of a ship) To be particularly wide in the middle. Since that ship is broad in the beam, I doubt it will fit through the narrow channel.
2. (of a person) To have an ample buttocks. Because I'm broad in the beam, I doubt those pants will fit me.
See also: beam, broad

be off beam

To be inaccurate or wrong. I never once said that! Your reporter is completely off beam in her accusations. I thought I knew what real estate costs around here, but wow, I was totally off beam.
See also: beam, off

beam down

To be sent to Earth via teleportation, as in stereotypical portrayals of aliens coming to Earth from their spaceship. This humorous phrase usually suggests that one is crazy. Did he just beam down from outer space? There's no way that plan will work!
See also: beam, down

Beam me up, Scotty

Get me out of here! Take me away! This phrase comes from the TV show Star Trek, in which it was used (with slightly different wording) as a command to be brought back onto the starship Enterprise via a form of teleportation, often when faced with a dangerous situation. As screaming preschoolers ran all around me, all I could think was, "Beam me up, Scotty!"
See also: beam, Scotty

beam up

1. To teleport someone or something, as in the stereotypical portrayals of aliens returning to their spaceship from Earth. In this new sci-fi movie, ordinary people get beamed up to an alien spaceship.
2. To die. The old man down the street is back in the hospital, and his family is worried that he'll beam up this time.
See also: beam, up

broad in the beam

1. (of a ship) Particularly wide in the middle. Since that ship is broad in the beam, I doubt it will fit through the narrow channel.
2. (of a person) Having an ample buttocks. Because I'm broad in the beam, I doubt those pants will fit me.
See also: beam, broad

be way off beam

To be inaccurate or wrong. Primarily heard in UK. I never once said that! Your reporter is way off beam in her accusations. I thought I knew what real estate costs around here, but wow, I was way off beam.
See also: beam, off, way

off beam

Mistaken, inaccurate, or incorrect; going against or straying away from the correct line of thinking. Hyphenated if used before a noun. I'm saddened that the president would choose to make remarks about our troops that are so off beam. The CEO's off-beam plans ended up costing the company nearly half a billion dollars in lost revenue.
See also: beam, off

Beam me up, Scotty!

Get me out of here!; Take me away from this mess! (From the late 1960s television program StarTrek.) This place is really crazy! Beam me up, Scotty! I've heard enough! Beam me up, Scotty!
See also: beam

beam someone or something up (to some place)

to transport someone or something (up) to something. (Originally in the context of a Star Trek adventure, but also used jocularly.) The captain asked the first mate to beam him up. Please beam up the crew, Roger. Beam me up so I can see your penthouse suite!
See also: beam, up

beam up

Sl. to die. (Alluding to the television program Star Trek.) Pete Dead? I didn't think he was old enough to beam up. I was so exhausted after climbing four flights that I was afraid I would beam up.
See also: beam, up

broad in the beam

 
1. Lit. [of a ship] wide at amidships. This old tub is broad in the beam and sits like a ball in the water, but I love her.
2. Fig. Inf. with wide hips or large buttocks. l am getting a little broad in the beam. It's time to go on a diet. John is just naturally broad in the beam.
See also: beam, broad

on the beam

Fig. exactly right; thinking along the correct lines. That's the right idea. Now you're on the beam! She's not on the beam yet. Explain it to her again.
See also: beam, on

steam someone's beam

Sl. to make someone angry. Being stood up really steams my beam! Come on, don't steam your beam. Remember how hard times are now.
See also: beam, steam

broad in the beam

Having broad hips or large buttocks. For example, I've grown too broad in the beam for these slacks. This expression originated in the 17th century and described the wideness of a ship. It began to be used for the human body only in the 1920s.
See also: beam, broad

off the beam

Off course, on the wrong track, as in He's way off the beam with that argument. This colloquial term and its antonym, on the beam, meaning "on the right track," allude to directing aircraft by means of radio beams. [Colloquial; mid-1900s]
See also: beam, off

on the beam

see under off the beam.
See also: beam, on

be way off beam

BRITISH
If something is way off beam, it is completely wrong or mistaken. Some of his remarks were way off beam. Note: This refers to the use of a radio signal or beam to direct aircraft which were coming in to land. A radio transmitter on one side of the runway transmitted dots, or short tones, while one on the other side transmitted dashes, or long tones. If pilots were coming in on the right course, the dots and dashes merged and the pilots heard a continuous tone.
See also: beam, off, way

a beam in your eye

a fault that is greater in yourself than in the person you are finding fault with.
This phrase comes from Matthew 7:3: ‘Why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thy own eye?’ For a mote in someone's eye, see mote.
See also: beam, eye

off (or way off) beam

on the wrong track; mistaken. informal
Originally, this phrase referred to the radio beam or signal used to guide aircraft.
1997 Anthony Barnett This Time I sample the press coverage to illustrate how large sections of the Fourth Estate were way off beam in their conviction that voters want the country steered back towards ‘Great Englishness’.
See also: beam, off

on your beam ends

near the end of your resources; desperate.
The beam referred to here is one of the main horizontal transverse timbers of a wooden ship; compare with broad in the beam (at broad). The phrase originated as the nautical term on her beam ends , and was used of a ship that had heeled over on its side and was almost capsizing.
See also: beam, end, on

broad in the beam

wide in the hips. informal
A beam was one of the horizontal transverse timbers in a wooden ship, and so the word came to refer to a ship's breadth at its widest point. It is from this sense that the current meaning of broad in the beam developed.
See also: beam, broad

off ˈbeam

(informal) wrong; incorrect: No, you’re way off beam there.A radio wave, or beam, can be used to guide aircraft. If the aircraft is off beam it is not following the correct course as set by the beam.
See also: beam, off

broad in the ˈbeam

(informal) having wide hips: Her waist is quite small, but she’s rather broad in the beam.
See also: beam, broad

beam/grin/smile from ear to ˈear

be smiling, etc. a lot because you are very pleased about something: I like your graduation photo, with you grinning from ear to ear and your parents looking so proud.
See also: beam, ear, grin, smile

Beam me up, Scotty!

sent. Get me out of here!; Take me away from this mess! (From the television program Star Trek.) This place is really crazy! Beam me up, Scotty!
See also: beam

beam up

in. to die. (From the television program Star Trek.) Pete Dead? I didn’t think he was old enough to beam up.
See also: beam, up

early beam(s)

n. dawn; early morning. (Streets.) He was away every day, early black to early beam.
See also: beam, early

early beam

verb
See also: beam, early

(I-)beam

(ˈ(ɑɪ)bim)
n. IBM, International Business Machines stock shares. (see also big blue.) How much beam do you own?

beam

verb
See I-beam

on the beam

1. mod. homing in on an aviation radio beam. (No longer a major navigational device.) The plane was on the beam and landed safely in the fog.
2. mod. on the right course or track. (From sense 1) That is exactly right. You are right on the beam.
3. and beaming mod. under the effects of marijuana. (Drugs.) Walter is on the beam again. How can he hold a job?
4. mod. smart; clever. That was well done, Tom. You’re on the beam.
See also: beam, on

beaming

verb
See also: beam

steam someone’s beam

tv. to make someone angry. Come on, don’t steam your beam. Remember how hard times are now.
See also: beam, steam

on the beam

1. Following a radio beam. Used of aircraft.
2. On the right track; operating correctly.
See also: beam, on
References in classic literature ?
This piece of bravado produced its effects,--the spell of the beam was broken.
At the shock of the beam, the half metallic door sounded like an immense drum; it was not burst in, but the whole cathedral trembled, and the deepest cavities of the edifice were heard to echo.
The long beam continued to belabor the door, at regular intervals, like the clapper of a bell, the stones to rain down, the door to groan.
At last it reached the ground, the horrible cry arose, and the black beam, as it rebounded from the pavement, resembled a serpent leaping.
He took advantage of their fright, and while they were fixing a superstitious glance on the club which had fallen from heaven, and while they were putting out the eyes of the stone saints on the front with a discharge of arrows and buckshot, Quasimodo was silently piling up plaster, stones, and rough blocks of stone, even the sacks of tools belonging to the masons, on the edge of the balustrade from which the beam had already been hurled.
All at once, at the moment when they were grouping themselves round the ram for a last effort, each one holding his breath and stiffening his muscles in order to communicate all his force to the decisive blow, a howl more frightful still than that which had burst forth and expired beneath the beam, rose among them.
They fled pell-mell, hurling the beam upon the bodies, the boldest as well as the most timid, and the parvis was cleared a second time.
She falls stern first, our beam upon her; slides like a lost soul down that pitiless ladder of light, and the Atlantic takes her.
She warns us to look out for the back-wash of the bad vortex in which (her beam shows it) she is even now reeling.
This paper adopted the hammering method to excite concrete beams with different pre-stress values, eccentricities and counterweights based on two kinds of methods including experiment and numerical simulation, processed and analyzed the collected mid-span acceleration of beams to quantitatively analyze the relationship between the fundamental frequency of beams and pre-stress.
The results depicted that beams repaired with Fospak mortar are capable of taking more load by 4% - 13.
Ive always been proud to see the faces of every Beam Master Distiller displayed on Jim Beam bottles across the world and these bottles feel even better in my hands when pouring this fine bourbon, said Seventh Generation Master Distiller and Jim Beams Great-Grandson, Fred Noe.
The in situ, or transparent, system uses an off-axis coded aperture camera that provides a magnified image of the beam cross-section, enabling beam positioning with high precision.
Recently, there has been growing interest in the study of Hermite-sinusoidal-Gaussian (HSG) beams as a result of the works of Casperson and Tovar [14] and Chen et al.
The parameter studied in this work is the GFRP strips applied in full length to tensile face of precracked and uncracked beams in one, two and five layers in order to observe the effect of GFRP thickness on flexural behavior as compared to control beam.