be made up

be made up

To be contrived and not true or real; to be fabricated. Julie finally admitted to the principal that her turtle did not eat her homework, and that the whole thing was made up. It turns out that the statistics were actually made up—they had no basis in reality.
See also: made, up

be made up about (something)

To be delighted about something. Primarily heard in UK. Did you hear how excited she is? She's very made up about getting into her dream school.
See also: made, up

be made up with (something)

To be delighted about something. Primarily heard in UK. Did you hear how excited she is? She's very made up with the news that her dream school accepted her.
See also: made, up

be made ˈup (about/with something)

(British English, informal) be very pleased or satisfied (about/with something): I’m really made up with the new job. It’s the type of work I’ve always wanted.
See also: made, up
References in periodicals archive ?
Some teachers save one Saturday a month for make-ups, and all lessons for the month may be made up only on that day.
I further learned that students who didn't have their required clothes and who refused either to wear a jumpsuit for class or oblige to collect trash, received a "double-F," the equivalent of two fails of which one could be made up by running laps a subsequent class period.
A portable mini-meal for school may be made up of a handful of nuts, a bagel, and some fruit.
Another portable mini-meal may be made up of pieces of cheese, an apple or carrot sticks, and peanuts.
The milk shakes should be kept in the refrigerator at home-they should be made up the night or in the morning before school if time allows.