be green about the gills

be green about the gills

To be nauseated. After all that drinking last night, I sure am green about the gills today. The steady rocking of the boat caused Colleen to be green about the gills.
See also: gill, green

green about the gills

Nauseated. After all that drinking last night, I sure am green about the gills today. The steady rocking of the boat caused Colleen to be green about the gills.
See also: gill, green

green about the gills

Also, green around the gills. Looking ill or nauseated, as in After that bumpy ride she looked quite green about the gills. The use of green to describe an ailing person's complexion dates from about 1300, and gills has referred to the flesh around human jaws and ears since the 1600s. Although in the 1800s white and yellow were paired with gills to suggest illness, the alliterative green has survived them.
See also: gill, green

green about (or around or at) the gills

looking or feeling ill or nauseous. informal
A person's gills are the fleshy parts between the jaw and the ears: this sense of the word dates from the early 17th century. Other colours are occasionally used to indicate a sickly appearance; much less common is rosy about the gills indicating good health.
See also: gill, green

ˌgreen about the ˈgills

(informal) looking or feeling as if you are going to be sick, especially at sea; seasick: You look a bit green about the gills. Go up on deck and get some fresh air.
Gills are the openings on the side of a fish’s head that it breathes through.
See also: gill, green