be for the chop

be for the chop

BRITISH, INFORMAL
COMMON
1. If someone is for the chop, they are about to lose their job. There are rumours that he's for the chop. Note: You can also say that someone faces the chop with the same meaning. He must play by next week or face the chop for the Challenge Cup final. Note: You can say that someone gets the chop, meaning they lose their job. He had hardly settled into his new job when he got the chop due to cutbacks. Note: You can also say that someone is trying to avoid the chop when they are trying not to lose their job. They are turning up to work earlier, and leaving later, in a bid to avoid the chop.
2. If something is for the chop, it is not going to be allowed to continue or remain. He won't say which programmes are for the chop. Note: You can say that something gets the chop, meaning it is not allowed to continue or remain. Some of the scenes that got the chop in America will be put back in for the Australian release. Note: The chop is also used in other structures and expressions with a similar meaning. Weekly broadcasts are now threatened with the chop. These are loss-making factories that deserve the chop. Compare with get the axe.
See also: chop

be for the ˈchop

(British English, informal)
1 (of a person) be likely to be dismissed from a job: Who’s next for the chop?
2 (of a plan, project, etc.) be likely to be stopped or ended
This refers to chopping (= cutting) a person’s head off with an axe as a punishment.
See also: chop