be down

be down

To feel sad, depressed, dejected, or generally unwell. I got some bad news this morning, so I'm a bit down at the moment. You didn't do that poorly on the exam, don't be so down!
See also: down

be down

1. Be depressed, in low spirits, as in During the winter months Sue's always down, but spring cheers her up. [Colloquial; mid-1800s]
2. Be knowledgeable, canny, or sophisticated, as in He was really down with the new group. This usage probably originated among jazz musicians. [Slang; mid-1940s]
See also: down

be down

v.
1. To be located or to take place at a location lower than where one currently is: The party is down in the basement.
2. To be located at some distance, following some path: The grocery store is three miles down this road. Her house is down that driveway. There is a gas station two miles down.
3. To be temporarily out of service or nonoperational: I tried to call you, but the circuits were down. The computer will be down for repairs until this afternoon.
4. To be at a low level or have a low quantity: Our fuel is down; we need to go to the gas station. The price of carrots is down from last year.
5. To be generally unhappy, in bad spirits, or depressed: Your jokes always make me feel better when I'm down.
6. be down on To disapprove of something or the behavior of someone: I thought we should sell off the unused land, but the committee was down on the idea. They are down on you for your silly remarks.
7. be down to To be reduced or lowered to some quantity or amount: Because of the big sale, the price of these shirts is now down to four dollars.
8. be down to To have available a lower quantity of something, especially due to gradual use or loss: I've spent most of my money; now I'm down to $3. The airplane was down to only three gallons of fuel when it landed.
9. Slang be down with To be in agreement or to cooperate with someone or something; to find something acceptable: That sounds like a good idea; I'm down with that. I need a partner; are you down with me?
See also: down