bay

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flourish like a green bay tree

To thrive; to grow very successfully. The green bay tree is known to grow several new branches every year. Wow, you have just been flourishing like a green bay tree ever since you changed majors.
See also: bay, flourish, green, like, tree

*at bay

Fig. at a distance. (*Typically: be ~; keep someone or something ~; remain ~.) I have to keep the bill collectors at bay until I get my paycheck. The mosquitoes will not remain at bay for very long.
See also: bay

bay at something

to howl at something. (Usually said of a dog, wolf, or coyote.) The dogs were baying at the moon. We heard a coyote in the distance, baying at the moon.
See also: bay

hold someone or something at bay

Fig. to make someone, a group, or an animal stay at a safe distance. (Originally referred only to animals.) I held the attacker at bay while Mary got away and called the police. The dogs held the bear at bay while I got my gun loaded.
See also: bay, hold

keep somebody at bay

also hold somebody at bay
to prevent someone from moving closer He held the police at bay with a gun for several hours.
See also: bay, keep

keep something at bay

also hold something at bay
to control something and prevent it from causing you problems She fought to keep her unhappiness at bay. In the garden, there's no security system to keep the rabbits at bay. Experts hope the economy will slow enough to keep inflation at bay.
See also: bay, keep

be baying for blood

  (British)
if a group of people are baying for blood, they want someone to be hurt or punished Families of the victims were baying for blood during the trial.
See also: bay, blood

keep something/somebody at bay

to prevent something or someone unpleasant from coming too near you or harming you If we can keep the rabbits at bay, we should have a good crop of vegetables in the garden. For me, overeating is a way of keeping my feelings at bay.
See also: bay, keep

at bay

Cornered, in distress, as in Angry bystanders chased the thief into an alley and held him at bay until the police arrived . This idiom originally came from hunting, where it describes an animal that has been driven back and now faces pursuing hounds. Its use for other situations dates from the late 1500s.
See also: bay

bay window

n. a belly; an abdomen. You are going to have to do something about that bay window.
See also: bay, window

at bay

To keep someone or something at a safe distance. The phrase derives from stag hunting, from a French word that also is the source of the English word for the baying howl that hounds make during a chance. A tired and cornered stag that turns to face the pursuing hounds is, for the moment, at a safe distance from its attackers.
See also: bay
References in classic literature ?
Late in the evening I heard the distant rumbling of wagons over bridges -- a sound heard farther than almost any other at night -- the baying of dogs, and sometimes again the lowing of some disconsolate cow in a distant barn-yard.
You old flea-headed woodchuck-chaser," I said to him--"you moon- baying, rabbit-pointing, eggstealing old beagle, can't you see that I don't want to leave you?
The light came and went on his lean, straining face; he threw his head up like a baying hound.