bath

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an early bath

A premature end to something. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. Take an early bath, Edwards! I don't tolerate illegal hits on my playing field!
See also: bath, early

take a bath (on something)

Sl. to accumulate large losses on a business transaction or an investment. (Alludes to getting soaked, a slang expression meaning "being heavily charged for something.") Sally took a bath on that stock that she bought. Its price went down to nothing. I'm afraid that I will take a bath on any investment I make.
See also: bath, take

throw the baby out with the bath(water)

Fig. to dispose of the good while eagerly trying to get rid of the bad. (Fig. on the image of carelessly emptying a tub of both the water inside as well as the baby that was being washed.) In her haste to talk down a project that had only a few disagreeable points, she has thrown the baby out with the bathwater. Hasty action on this major spending bill will result in throwing out the baby with the bath.
See also: baby, bath, out, throw

throw out the baby with the bath water

to lose the good parts when you get rid of the bad parts of something You can't close the airport because one airline has problems - that's just throwing out the baby with the bath water.
See also: baby, bath, out, throw, water

take a (financial) bath

to lose money on an investment Investors took a bath when they had to resell the bonds at lower prices than they had paid.
See also: bath, take

take a bath

  (mainly american)
to suffer a bad financial loss Several banks took a bath when the industry collapsed.
See also: bath, take

an early bath

  (British & Australian informal)
if you take an early bath, you are forced to stop doing an activity sooner than you intended to
Usage notes: This phrase is often used about sports such as football.
The spokesman took an early bath after a series of embarrassing and incorrect statements. And that's his second yellow card so it looks like an early bath for Taylor.
See also: bath, early

throw the baby out with the bath water

to get rid of the good parts as well as the bad parts of something when you are trying to improve it I don't think we should throw the baby out with the bath water. There are some good features of the present system that I think we should retain.
See also: baby, bath, out, throw, water

take a bath

Experience serious financial loss, as in The company took a bath investing in that new product. This idiom, which originated in gambling, transfers washing oneself in a bathtub to being "cleaned out" financially. [Slang; first half of 1900s]
See also: bath, take

throw out the baby with the bath water

Discard something valuable along with something not wanted. For example, I know you don't approve of that one item in the bill but we shouldn't throw out the baby with the bath water by voting the bill down . This expression, with its vivid image of a baby being tossed out with a stream of dirty water, is probably translated from a German proverb, Das Kind mit dem Bade ausschütten ("Pour the baby out with the bath"). It was first recorded in English in 1853 by Thomas Carlyle, who translated many works from German.
See also: baby, bath, out, throw, water

take a bath (on something)

tv. to have large financial losses on an investment. The broker warned me that I might take a bath if I bought this stuff.
See also: bath, on, take

take a bath

verb
See also: bath, take

tonsil bath

n. liquor; a drink of liquor. I could use a little tonsil bath about now.
See also: bath, tonsil

take a bath

Informal
To experience serious financial loss: "Small investors who latched on to hot new issues took a bath in Wall Street" (Paul A. Samuelson).
See also: bath, take

throw the baby out with the bath water

Slang
To discard something valuable along with something not desired, usually unintentionally.
See also: baby, bath, out, throw, water
References in classic literature ?
It was a city formed of two layers only; the Romanesque layer and the Gothic layer; for the Roman layer had disappeared long before, with the exception of the Hot Baths of Julian, where it still pierced through the thick crust of the Middle Ages.
Nag waved to and fro, and then Rikki-tikki heard him drinking from the biggest water-jar that was used to fill the bath.
Beware my Laura (she would often say) Beware of the insipid Vanities and idle Dissipations of the Metropolis of England; Beware of the unmeaning Luxuries of Bath and of the stinking fish of Southampton.
Sir Walter had at first thought more of London; but Mr Shepherd felt that he could not be trusted in London, and had been skillful enough to dissuade him from it, and make Bath preferred.
It is such an abominable trick to be ill here instead of at Bath that I can scarcely command myself at all.
During the best part of it I religiously followed the doctor's mandate and did nothing whatever, except moon about the house and garden and go out for two hours a day in a Bath chair.
Then forming his features into a set smile, and affectedly softening his voice, he added, with a simpering air, "Have you been long in Bath, madam?
It was never easy to get plenty of hot water, since the kitchen boiler did not work, and it was impossible for two persons to have a bath on the same day.
I always determine - when thinking over the matter in London - that I'll get up early every morning, and go and have a dip before breakfast, and I religiously pack up a pair of drawers and a bath towel.
For David, as I have noticed, loves to splash in his bath and to slip back into it from the hands that would transfer him to a towel.
The bath is ready, Tara of Helium," the girl responded, her eyes still twinkling with merriment, for she well knew that in the heart of her mistress was no anger that could displace the love of the princess for her slave.
Around the edge of the pool were set rows of fine emeralds as large as door-knobs, while the water of the bath was clear as crystal.
Take her right up, Alec; I've got the hot water ready, and after a nice bath, she shall have a cup of my sage tea, and be rolled up in blankets to sleep off her cold," answered the old lady, cheerily, as she bustled away to give orders.
The coach which had brought the young lady and her maid, and which, perhaps, the reader may have hitherto concluded was her own, was, indeed, a returned coach belonging to Mr King, of Bath, one of the worthiest and honestest men that ever dealt in horse-flesh, and whose coaches we heartily recommend to all our readers who travel that road.
Kitty was the only one who did not hear it all--she was summoned to give Mitya his bath.