bashing


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Related to bashing: French bashing

bashing

n. criticizing; defaming. (A combining form that follows the name of the person or thing being criticized.) On TV they had a long session of candidate bashing, and then they read the sports news.
See also: bash
References in periodicals archive ?
These factors have forced doctors at Al Dhaid Hospital, where the Indian boy was brought dead after the accident on Tuesday, to say that children less than 10 years should not be taken for dune bashing.
The reasons why bashing imposes costs on the central bank were described in the introduction.
But the church hierarchy remains fixated on winning tax subsidies for its large parochial school system and is not above bashing public schools to achieve that goal.
Others, like Sacramento's Lavender Angels, are "watchdog" groups that call the police to respond to bashings.
The first day of class, students were told about "student bashing"--it would not be allowed, and that included gay bashing.
Also, for a minimum $2 donation, Cruise Night attendees will be able to contribute to the center by bashing a late model Ford Pinto with a sledge hammer.
With our show, if you're homophobic, the ray bashing is built into the show-you don't even have to do it.
I first became curious about what it means to be a gay in smalltown America after a man in Piqua, Ohio, told me, "I can't say whether there are gays here, but definitely there's a lot of queer bashing.
After all, as a columnist for New York Newsday in the 1990s, I was accused of gay "neocon"-ing and movement bashing myself, especially when I called for the closing of sex clubs that didn't strictly enforce safer sex.
Now, after weeks of bashing, the Daily News endorses a citywide vote
Queer bashing flourishes in environments where the perpetrators feel safe," Vachss says.
Cynthia Bowers remembers the instant the first wire-service report about the Matthew Shepard gay bashing came across her desk.
Gay bashing is not a new subject, But filmmaker Arthur Dong (Coming Out Under Fire) finds a refreshing new angle on the issue in his tour-de-force documentary Licensed to Kill.