base

(redirected from baseness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to baseness: basifier

base instinct

A subconscious urge, behavior, or intuition directed by primeval, animalistic, self-serving, and/or ignoble motivations. Greed and selfishness are unfortunately two of the base instincts ingrained in the human psyche. Though he is an upstanding citizen, when he drinks, he unfortunately succumbs to his base instincts.
See also: base, instinct

base motive

Motivation for some action or actions that is guided by selfishness or moral depravity. It is clear now that his decision to marry into her wealthy family was led purely by base motives. I don't believe the defendant had any base motives in this case. I think she was well-intentioned but naïve about the repercussions of her actions.
See also: base

base over apex

Literally, bottom over top, as in the way one might stumble or fall; head over heels. The ice on the paths is so dangerous because you can't always see it. Just yesterday, I slipped and went completely base over apex!
See also: base, over

install(ed) base

business jargon The number units of a particular product or service that are currently in use, especially software or an Internet or computing platform. (Also referred to as "install(ed) user base" or simply "user base.") There have been fears that the computer giant's existing installed base may decline after their newest operating system is implemented.
See also: base

install(ed) user base

business jargon The number units of a particular product or service that are currently in use, especially software or an Internet or computing platform. (Also referred to as "install(ed) base" or "user base.") There have been fears that the computer giant's existing installed user base may decline after their newest operating system is implemented.
See also: base, user

user base

business jargon The number units of a particular product or service that are currently in use, especially software or an Internet or computing platform. (Also referred to as "install(ed) user base" or simply "install(ed) base.") There have been fears that the computer giant's existing user base may decline after their newest operating system is implemented. The video game developer's insistence on backwards compatibility in their newest console shows an earnest effort to keep their user base happy.
See also: base, user

base (up)on

To found or root something on a particular idea or occurrence. A noun can be used between "base" and "on" or "upon." My love of science is based upon an interest in experimentation. Unfortunately, she has a low opinion of me. I think she based it on our first meeting, which didn't go well.
See also: base

base on balls

In baseball, the term used when a batter reaches first base after taking four pitches outside the strike zone (known as "balls"). A: "Oh, Robertson's on first?" B: "Yeah, base on balls."
See also: ball, base, on

base (one's) opinion on

To found or root one's view of something or someone on a particular idea or occurrence. Unfortunately, I think she based her opinion of me entirely on one wild night out together. I'm basing my opinion on the facts, and nothing else.
See also: base, on, opinion

be off base

1. To be inaccurate or wrong. I never once said that! Your reporter is completely off base in her accusations. I thought I knew what real estate costs around here, but wow, I was totally off base.
2. Of a runner in baseball, to not be touching the base. The pitcher saw that the runner at first was off base and threw him out.
See also: base, off

get to first base

1. To successfully move through the initial phase of something. I doubt we'll get to first base with this proposal— the board seems pretty skeptical.
2. slang To kiss a date. (When baseball is used as a metaphor for sexual acts, kissing is seen as an initial step or prelude to sexual intercourse—a "home run.") A: "Did you get to first base with Dave last night?" B: "A lady doesn't kiss and tell!"
See also: base, first, get

off base

Incorrect; mistaken or misinformed; not aligned with reality. (An allusion to baseball players, who are only safe if their foot is touching one of the four bases. Hyphenated if used before a noun.) Primarily heard in US. Your arguments would be compelling if your entire premise wasn't completely off base. You need to stop making these off-base assumptions about the government.
See also: base, off

base one's opinion on something

to make a judgment or form an opinion from something. You must not base your opinion on one bad experience. I base my opinion on many years of studying the problem.
See also: base, on, opinion

base something (up)on someone or something

to ground something, such as one's opinion, decision, or thinking, on someone or something; to found one's ideas or attitude on something. (Upon is more formal and less commonly used than on.) I base my opinion on many, many facts. I based my opinion upon my own seasoned judgment.
See also: base, on

get to first base (with someone or something)

 and reach first base (with someone or something)
Fig. to make a major advance with someone or something. I wish I could get to first base with this business deal. John adores Sally, but he can't even reach first base with her. She won't even speak to him.
See also: base, first, get

*off base

 
1. Lit. [of a runner in baseball] not having a foot touching the base. (*Typically: be ~; get ~.) The runner was off base but the first baseman didn't tag him out.
2. Fig. unrealistic; inexact; wrong. *Typically: be ~; get ~.) I'm afraid you're off base when you state that this problem will take care of itself. You're way off base if you think I was to blame!
See also: base, off

reach first base

(with someone or something) Go to get to first base (with someone or something).
See also: base, first, reach

steal a base

Fig. to sneak from one base to another in baseball. The runner stole second base, but he nearly got put out on the way. Tom runs so slowly that he never tries to steal a base.
See also: base, steal

touch base (with someone)

to talk to someone; to confer with someone briefly. I need to touch base with John on this matter. John and I touched base on this question yesterday, and we are in agreement.
See also: base, touch

get to first base

Also, reach first base.
1. Succeed in the initial phase of something; meet with preliminary approval. For example, They were delighted that they'd gotten to first base in the negotiations. This term alludes to the first base of baseball, which is the first step toward scoring a run for the batter's team. [c. 1900]
2. Reach the initial stage of sexual intimacy, such as kissing. For example, Mary is so shy that I can't even get to first base with her. [1920s]
See also: base, first, get

off base

Wrong, relying on a mistaken premise, as in His description of the accounting system was totally off base. This metaphoric term originated in baseball, where a runner who steps off a base can be put out. [c. 1940]
See also: base, off

touch base with

Make contact or renew communications with, as in I'll try to touch base with you when I'm in Ohio, or The candidate touched base with every ethnic group in the city. This idiom comes from baseball, where a runner must touch each base without being tagged before a run can be scored.
See also: base, touch

get to first base

1. If you get to first base, you begin to make progress with your plans. Note: In baseball, players have to hit the ball and then run round all four corners or bases to score a run. We couldn't get to first base with any U.S. banks. They didn't want to take the risk. We wonder why there are so few women in leadership — they get criticized before they even get to first base.
2. If someone gets to first base, they succeed in kissing a boyfriend or girlfriend or touching them as a way of starting a sexual relationship. Note: In baseball, players have to hit the ball and then run round all four corners or bases to score a run. It takes Declan, the ladies' man of the cast, until the third episode to get to first base with any of his prey. Note: You can also use get to second base, to say that you get to the next stage of a sexual relationship. On a date, would it be easier to get to second base with Laverne or Shirley?
See also: base, first, get

off base

mainly AMERICAN
COMMON If someone's judgment or opinion is off base, it is mistaken or wrong. Note: In baseball, players have to hit the ball and then run round all four corners or bases to score a run. I don't think the church is off base at all in taking a moral stand on this. For him to blame his mother for this is really off base. Note: In baseball, if a player is caught off base, a member of the opposite team gets them out while they are between bases.
See also: base, off

touch base

If you touch base with someone, you contact them, often when you have not spoken to them or seen them for a long time. Note: In baseball, players have to hit the ball and then run round all four corners or bases to score a run. Being there gave me a chance to touch base with some old friends that I hadn't seen for a year. A brief phone-call is often made during the month to touch base and update the parent on any changes in the basic treatment plan. Note: In baseball, batters have to touch the first, second, and third bases to score a run.
See also: base, touch

get to first base

achieve the first step towards your objective. informal, chiefly North American
1962 P. G. Wodehouse Service with a Smile She gives you the feeling that you'll never get to first base with her.
See also: base, first, get

off base

mistaken. North American informal
1947 Time Your Latin American department was off base in its comparison of the Portillo Hotel in Chile with our famous Sun Valley.
See also: base, off

touch base

briefly make or renew contact with someone or something. informal
1984 Armistead Maupin Babycakes In search of a routine, he touched base with his launderette, his post office, his nearest market.
Base in these three phrases refers to each of the four points in the angles of the ‘diamond’ in baseball, which a player has to reach in order to score a run.
See also: base, touch

off ˈbase

(American English, informal)
1 completely wrong about something: You’re way off base with that guess.
2 unprepared: The question caught her off base.
In baseball, a base is one of the four positions that a player must reach in order to score points.
See also: base, off

get to first ˈbase (with somebody/something)

(also reach/make first ˈbase (with somebody/something)) (informal, especially American English) successfully complete the first stage of something: The project hasn’t even reached first base yet. Why all this delay?
This idiom comes from baseball. First base is the first of four positions (= bases) that a player must reach in order to score points.
See also: base, first, get

touch ˈbase (with somebody)

(informal) make contact with somebody again: She travels to Boston every week to touch base with her office.I spent an hour or two sending emails and touching base with my friends.
See also: base, touch

base in

v.
1. To operate from some location. Used chiefly in the passive: Our company is based in Fresno.
2. To establish or found something in some location: We based our organization in the heart of the city.
3. To have something as a foundation or origin: The linguist based the analysis of the sentence structure in a standard framework.
See also: base

base on

v.
To form, develop, or found something on the basis of something else: I based my decision on the information you gave me. The film was based on a popular book.
See also: base, on

base

mod. rude; gross. (California.) You are so, like, base!

get to first (base) (with someone)

in. to achieve a basic or initial level of intimacy with someone, such as getting some attention or even getting kissed. I’m too shy. I just know I can’t get to first base with her.
See also: base, first, get

get to first base

verb
See also: base, first, get

touch base (with someone)

tv. to make contact with someone. I wanted to touch base with you just in case something had gone wrong.
See also: base, touch

touch base

verb
See also: base, touch

way off (base)

mod. on the wrong track; completely wrong. (see also off base.) Sorry. You are way off. You should just give up.
See also: base, off, way

off base

Badly mistaken.
See also: base, off
References in periodicals archive ?
While these methods add to the reader's freedom, the writer's mark is further evident in the opposites in which the novel is framed: the finite rime of the action and the infinite time of death; protagonists representing good and evil, nobility and baseness, detachment and greed; intense love of life and a poignant sense of one's own mortality; finite urban space and infinite space of sky and water; having everything and losing everything.
In his journal, Cluny makes no secret of his disdain for vulgarity, intolerance, baseness, or superficiality.
On view recently in his first solo show in the United States, Thomas Kiesewetter's untitled blech sculptures are all the more appealing for the baseness of their material.
McDougall, 33) The scoundrel carries his baseness around like an ID card.
His heads instead see the baseness of life at its most primal: feet (what could be more base than our soles?
As the prominent figures of the narratives, they expose the men in all of their baseness.
With the fifteen objects he showed here--and almost as many drawings, which were akin to those of Glen Baxter--Ramette presented a mad universe in which absurd logic surges forth in the domestic banality of everyday life and human beings oscillate between moral baseness and spiritual grandeur, between the desire for damage and the desire for freedom.
But now, in the last quarter of the twentieth century, looking back to the time of war and political terror, I think less of crime and baseness and more and more of human capability of the purest love and sacrifice.
That this seductive allure is symbolized by the baseness of TV porn, with all its cynical artifice, speaks eloquently to how the city sets agendas of meaning for the country as a whole.
Your innumerable doctrines, baseness is their basis, / have failed, are bankrupt" (tr.
to cut through to the ultimate truth" of contemporary life - its baseness.
Love, death, joy, sorrow, noble deeds and baseness, courage and cowardice, generosity and meanness - all the innate attributes of human life are reflected and portrayed in A Long-Awaited Day.
And it is therefore concentrated equally in the domain of baseness and of an attack on form.
Here I must ask myself how I am to take my argument with Bondarenko any further without falling into baseness myself, since his whole article is constructed on these sorts of banalities, trite remarks, and demagogic pronouncements.
By coming close to Marie's own viewpoint, Preisler has also increased the baseness, the earthiness of the tale.