barge in(to)

barge in(to)

1. To abruptly and/or rudely interrupt or intrude on someone or something without warning. My bedroom is a private place, you can't just barge in like that! John thought he'd found the door to the restroom, but he accidentally barged into the board meeting instead.
2. To collide with another person or thing. In this usage, "into" is always used. She cut her forehead when she barged into the bookcase. I rounded the corner and nearly barged into Tara.
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barge in (to some place)

Fig. to go or come rudely into some place. He just barged right in without knocking. Don't barge in like that, without letting us know you're here!
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barge in

(on someone or something) Fig. to break in on someone or something; to interrupt someone or something. Oh! I'm sorry. I didn't mean to barge in on you. They barged in on the church service and caused a commotion. Please don't interrupt me! You can't just barge in like that!
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barge in

Enter rudely or abruptly, intrude. For example, Her mother never knocks but just barges in. The term is also put as barge into or barge in on to mean interrupt, as in Who asked you to barge into our conversation? These phrases use to barge in the sense of "bump into" or "knock against," which may allude to the propensity of these clumsy vessels to collide with other craft. [Late 1800s]
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barge in

v.
1. To intrude and disrupt: The party was going fine until some uninvited guests barged in.
2. barge in on To intrude on and disrupt some activity or group: I wish you hadn't barged in on the meeting—that was very rude. We were playing cards when my brother barged in on us and told us the news.
See also: barge