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barefaced lie

A blatantly obvious and/or impudent untruth, one in which the liar does not attempt to disguise his or her mendacity. My opponent's assertion that I intend to raise the tax rates is baseless; it is nothing but a barefaced lie.
See also: barefaced, lie

bare necessities

That which is absolutely essential, with nothing superfluous, extravagant, or unnecessary. All I'm looking for in a mobile phone is the bare necessities: the ability to make phone calls. They weren't kidding when they said the apartment only had the bare necessities: just a bed, a bathroom, and a stove!
See also: bare, necessity

bare (one's) teeth

To display an angry, violent, and/or threatening reaction to or against something or someone, as does a dog or wolf when threatened. I will bare my teeth to anyone who tries to take away my land. We seemed to be getting along just fine, but she suddenly bared her teeth when I brought up religion.
See also: bare, teeth

bare (one's) breast

1. To expose oneself in a vulnerable or unguarded position, especially to that which may cause harm or distress. I bare my breast to you, so do as you will. I am at your mercy! He bared his breast to the armed guards to show that he was not a threat.
2. To share with another person one's private emotions and thoughts, especially those that are emotionally troubling or make oneself vulnerable to the other person in some way. I bared my breast to Samantha and told her how much I loved her.
See also: bare, breast

barefaced liar

One who tells blatantly obvious and/or impudent untruths easily and with little or no attempt to disguise the lie. Everyone knows he is just a barefaced liar. It's a wonder anyone believes a thing he says anymore.
See also: barefaced, liar

cupboard is bare

1. Literally, there is no or very little food in the house. Often pluralized. I wish I had something to offer you to eat, but we haven't done our grocery shopping this week, and I'm afraid the cupboards are bare.
2. By extension, resources—especially money—are very tight or nonexistent. Often pluralized. The government has promised to help alleviate the strain on those out of work, but I don't know how it will accomplish that when its own cupboards are bare. The school district's cupboard is bare after federal funding was cut by 20%.
See also: bare, cupboard

bare metal

Computer hardware without an operating system. Right now, my new computer is bare metal, and I can't wait to build it and configure it just the way I want.
See also: bare, metal

bare one's soul (to someone)

Fig. to reveal one's innermost thoughts to someone; to tell another person exactly how one feels about someone or something. Mary bared her soul to Jane and Jane told Mary her problems also. You don't have to bare your soul to me. Just tell me why you are crying.
See also: bare, soul

bare something

the smallest or least possible. Bob did the bare minimum of work to pass the class. Food, clothing, and shelter are the bare necessities of life.

bare something to someone

to reveal or disclose something to someone. I have to know a guy pretty well before I will bare my innermost thoughts to him. Our criminal involvement was bared to the judge.
See also: bare

bare-bones

Cliché limited; stripped down; lacking refinements or extras. This one is the bare-bones model. It has no accessories at all.

show one's teeth

 and bare one's teeth
Fig. to act in an angry or threatening manner. (Alludes to what an angry wolf or dog does.) We thought Bob was meek and mild, but he really showed his teeth when Jack insulted his girlfriend. The enemy forces didn't expect the country they invaded to bare its teeth.
See also: show, teeth

stand there with one's bare face hanging out

Rur. to stand some place looking helpless and stupid. Say something. Don't just stand there with your bare face hanging out. she just stood there with her bare face hanging out while they took away everything she owned.
See also: bare, face, hanging, out, stand

lay bare something

(slightly formal) also lay something bare
to make something obvious that was not known before Her story lays bare the conflicts between two ambitious brothers. The trial was the first to lay bare the secrets of the organization.
Related vocabulary: bare your soul
See also: bare, lay

bare your soul

to express your secret thoughts and feelings Although people are willing to bare their souls about subjects like rape, grief is still a difficult subject to talk about.
Related vocabulary: lay bare something
See also: bare, soul

bare your heart/soul

to tell someone your secret thoughts and feelings (often + to ) We don't know each other that well. I certainly wouldn't bare my heart to her.
See also: bare, heart

the bare bones

the most basic parts of something, without any detail We believe we have the bare bones of an agreement. Reduced to its bare bones, the theory states that animals adapt to suit their surroundings.
See also: bare, bone

with your bare hands

without using any type of tool or weapon The court heard how Roberts strangled the woman with his bare hands.
See lay bare
See also: bare, hand

lay bare something

to discover or tell people about something that was not previously known or was previously kept secret It's been promoted as the biography that lays bare the truth behind the legend.
See also: bare, lay

show your teeth

to show that you are angry and prepared to defend yourself Come on, let him know you're angry - show your teeth!
See also: show, teeth

bare bones

The mere essentials or plain, unadorned framework of something, as in This outline gives just the bare bones of the story; details will come later. This phrase transfers the naked skeleton of a body to figurative use. [c. 1900]
See also: bare, bone

barefaced lie

A shameless falsehood. For example, Bill could tell a barefaced lie with a straight face. The adjective barefaced means "beardless," and one theory is that in the 1500s this condition was considered brazen in all but the youngest males. By the late 1600s barefaced also meant "brazen" or "bold," the meaning alluded to in this phrase.
See also: barefaced, lie

bare hands, with one's

With one's hands but without tools, weapons, or other implements. For example, Jean assembled the new stove with her bare hands. This phrase, first recorded in 1604, extends the literal meaning, "with uncovered (that is, without gloves) and hence unprotected hands," to "unaided by implements."
See also: bare

bare necessities

Just sufficient resources, with nothing to spare. For example, The room was furnished with just the bare necessities-bed, table, chair. This idiom uses bare in the sense of "mere, and nothing else," a usage dating from about 1200.
See also: bare, necessity

bare one's soul

Reveal one's most private thoughts and feelings. For example, Teenagers rarely bare their souls to their parents; they prefer their peers. This figurative use of the verb bare, which literally means "make bare" or "uncover," dates from a.d. 1000.
See also: bare, soul

bare one's teeth

Also, show one's teeth. Indicate hostility and readiness to fight, as in His refusal to accept my offer made it clear I'd have to bare my teeth, or In this instance, calling in a lawyer is showing one's teeth. This figurative term transfers the snarl of a dog to human anger. It first was recorded as show one's teeth in 1615.
See also: bare, teeth

cupboard is bare, the

The desired resources are not available, as in The schools are asking for a budget increase but the cupboard is bare. This metaphoric expression may have come from the nursery rhyme: "Old Mother Hubbard, went to the cupboard, to fetch her poor dog a bone, And when she went there, the cupboard was bare, and so the poor dog had none" (Sarah Catherine Martin, The Comic Adventures of Old Mother Hubbard, 1805).
See also: cupboard

bare-ass(ed)

mod. with a naked posterior exposed; totally naked. (Usually objectionable.) He ran right through the room—totally bare-assed—looking scared as hell.

bare-ass

verb

stand there with one’s bare face hanging out

in. to stand someplace looking helpless and stupid. Say something. Don’t just stand there with your bare face hanging out.
See also: bare, face, hanging, out, stand
References in periodicals archive ?
Most importantly, the Acadians had little use for government, beyond the barest minimum necessary in a culture devoted to the individual pursuit of happiness.
Funny thing, though, if you check most popular texts on Canadian history, you will find only the barest mention made of the role of these trailblazers and nation builders.
maintains only the barest hint of a malty middle in the mouth [and it is] dry-hopped for extra quenching in the face of rising warmth.
Both the Jefferson nickel and Buffalo nickel designs are entirely indigenous, with only the barest nod to another culture in the motto E Pluribus Unum (from many--one).
The bill places only the barest limits on investigatory powers.
With the just the barest of details, dedicated Tyneside postmen tracked down Army veteran Adam Hastings to his home in Newcastle.
Wes Navarro, who supported the 10th Mountain Division at Bagram Air Base, Afghanistan; he remembered families reduced to the barest standard of living, for which 10-year-old boys were the sole providers, but he was impressed by their spirit.
Guided by only the barest outline of a plot, players were set loose in dark, subterranean corridors, blasting monsters with gleeful abandon.
Sleekly made from steel plate and chromium steel, this bullet-shaped can has a corrosion-resistant exterior; a lid that forms an odor-proof seal and opens and closes silently at the barest touch, thanks to a uniquely designed hinge; an interior metal bucket that may be lifted out to empty it or can accommodate "SmartFix" bin liners which can be disposed of simply and neatly; an unobtrusive, yet rugged hand grip that allows you to move the bin easily, even when fully loaded; and a plastic base to prevent scratching the floor.
Playgirl editors took to the screening room to give readers the "skinny" on the movies that include the barest essentials of their favorite stars.
com; L'Oreal Translucide Sheer Blush in Barest Glow, $10, at drugstores
The movies is really a feckless collection of sad plaims for which Moore offers only the barest glimmer of hope for a solution.
It is often obvious, however, that these overnight experts lack the barest fundamentals in the subject.
director Roger Weatherby yesterday said: "We are very aware of the inconvenience and the potential intrusiveness of the questions, but we feel that we have kept it to the barest minimum.
You can take the barest bone ingredients and make them into something that demonstrates [science].