baptism


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

baptism by fire

1. The first time a soldier enters combat. Taken from a phrase that originates from the Bible, in Matthew 3:11. As they marched onto the battlefield, you could see all of the uniformed boys become men as they experienced baptism by fire.
2. A difficult ordeal that one has to undergo through immersion and without preparation. One week into her new job, Mary felt like she was undergoing a baptism by fire when she was suddenly put in charge of the company's largest account.
See also: baptism, by, fire

baptism of fire

1. The first time a soldier enters combat. Taken from a phrase that originates from the Bible, in Matthew 3:11. As they marched onto the battlefield, you could see all of the uniformed boys become men as they experienced baptism of fire.
2. A difficult ordeal that one has to undergo through immersion and without preparation. One week into her new job, Mary felt like she was undergoing a baptism of fire when she was suddenly put in charge of the company's largest account.
See also: baptism, fire, of

baptism of fire

Fig. a first experience of something, usually something difficult or unpleasant. My son's just had his first visit to the dentist. He stood up to this baptism of fire very well. Mary's had her baptism of fire as a teacher. She was assigned to the worst class in the school.
See also: baptism, fire, of

baptism of fire

A severe ordeal or test, especially an initial one, as in This audition would be Robert's baptism of fire. This term transfers the original religious rite of baptism, whereby holiness is imparted, to various kinds of ordeal. At first it signified the death of martyrs at the stake, and in 19th-century France it was used for a soldier's first experience of combat. Currently it is used more loosely for any difficult first encounter.
See also: baptism, fire, of

a baptism of fire

COMMON If your first experience of a new situation is a baptism of fire, it is very difficult or unpleasant. They have given themselves a baptism of fire by playing the four best teams in the world. Having never managed a team before, I was suddenly managing thirty people. It was a baptism of fire. Note: This expression originally referred to the deaths of martyrs (= people who die because of their beliefs) by burning. It was later used by the French Emperors Napoleon Bonaparte and Napoleon III to refer to someone's first experience of battle.
See also: baptism, fire, of

a baptism of fire

a difficult introduction to a new job or activity.
A baptism of fire was originally a soldier's initiation into battle.
1998 Times Opposition spokesmen do not normally face a baptism of fire, but the Bank of England's unexpected decision…provided the Shadow Chancellor with an opportunity to make an early mark.
See also: baptism, fire, of

a ˌbaptism of ˈfire

an unpleasant or a frightening first experience of something: Her first day in the job was a real baptism of fire because she had to deal with a very difficult case immediately.
See also: baptism, fire, of
References in periodicals archive ?
Part Two provides an introduction to the subject of experiencing the baptism of the Spirit, receiving the baptism, and evidences of the baptism.
Asked why baptism was not a priority for these families, Recio said: 'For them, survival came first, they needed to have food on the table every day.
One such complex sacrament is the ritual of baptism, through which Copts believe they are born again by being immersed in water three times in the name of the Holy Trinity: the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit.
In his contribution, he asks the believers' baptism churches some important questions that might lead forward in the question of mutual recognition of baptism with churches that practice infant baptism.
In general, baptism reflects what a denomination (or the particular priest/minister) believes is most important about Jesus' life and death and what he effected in terms of humanity's relationship to God.
Regarded as the inauguration of the public life of Jesus, the baptism then is a gesture that anticipates the climax of Jesus' public life: his sacrificial death on the Cross for humankind.
In reflecting on Jesus' baptism, we are also invited to reflect on our own.
Because of its theological depth along with practical implications this monograph has the potential both to further scholarly ecumenical conversation and to help pastors deepen the understanding and practices of baptism in believer's church traditions.
In the Byzantine Tradition, and in the Christian East in general, Baptism forms one integrated rite of initiation that is celebrated together with Chrismation (what the west calls Confirmation) and Eucharist.
From a lectionary and liturgical standpoint, putting this creation story in conjunction with the baptism and the conversation about the Holy Spirit's presence there brings up the question and it is worth pondering.
For Cross, baptism as understood in the New Testament was integral to the primitive preaching of the gospel.
This is not a historical work about baptism and confirmation.
Nidal Qatamin, a representative of Prince Ghazi bin Mohammed, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Baptism Site, announced places of pilgrimage in Jordan accredited to the Vatican for Christians.
It may also be noted that Jesus did not consider his baptism to be completed until he had fulfilled the role of the Ebed Jahweh, the suffering servant of God.
Moran's paper discussed the "grace of the baptism in the Holy Spirit," so as to suggest that the baptism of the Holy Spirit was an event that was completely separate from the baptism of water normally associated with conversion.