bank


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Related to bank: Citibank

Bank Night

obsolete A lottery event popular in the US during the Great Depression in which a member of a movie theater audience could win a cash prize if his or her name was called. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. Wouldn't you know it? The one time they call my name for Bank Night and I had to leave early for a dinner party!
See also: bank, night

bankbook

1. Literally, a book in which a depositor's financial transactions, such as deposits and withdrawals, are recorded by a bank. Now make sure you don't lose the bankbook, or the teller won't deposit this check.
2. By extension, wealth or finances in general. I'm a little worried about how I'm going to pay my rent this month because my bankbook is rather thin these days.

bank on something

Fig. to be so sure of something that one can trust it as one might trust a bank with one's money. I will be there on time. You can bank on it. I need a promise of your help. I hope I can bank on it.
See also: bank, on

bank something up

 (against something)
1. to heap or mound up something so that it presses against something. Walter banked the coals up against the side of the furnace. He banked up the coals against the side. Tim banked the coals up.
2. to heap or mound up something to guard against something. They had to build barriers to hide behind. They banked dirt and rubble up against the oncoming attackers. Who banked up this dirt against the flood? The river was rising, so we banked some dirt up.
See also: bank, up

break the bank

Fig. to use up all one's money. (Alludes to casino gambling, in the rare event when a gambler wins more money than the house has on hand.) It will hardly break the bank if we go out to dinner just once. Buying a new dress at a discount price won't break the bank.
See also: bank, break

can take it to the bank

Fig. able to depend on the truthfulness of my statement: it is not counterfeit or bogus; to be able to bank on something. Believe me. What I am telling you is the truth. You can take it to the bank. This information is as good as gold. You can take it to the bank.
See also: bank, can, take

cry all the way to the bank

Fig. to make a lot of money on something that one ought to be ashamed of. Jane: Have you read the new book by that romance novelist? They say it sold a million copies, but it's so badly written that the author ought to be ashamed of herself. Alan: I'm sure she's crying all the way to the bank. That dreadful movie had no artistic merit. I suppose the people who produced it are crying all the way to the bank.
See also: all, bank, cry, way

laugh all the way to the bank

Fig. to be very happy about money that has been earned by doing something that other people might think is unfair or that they criticized. He may not be in the nicest business, but he is doing well and can laugh all the way to the bank. She makes tons of money doing what no one else will do and laughs all the way to the bank.
See also: all, bank, laugh, way

bank on something

to depend on something All I can bank on is that when I tell Dad what happened, he'll know what to do.
See also: bank, on

break the bank

to cost too much Having a winter vacation in the sun without breaking the bank is a dream come true.
See also: bank, break

laugh all the way to the bank

to be pleased about the profit earned from doing something Team owners complain about the latest TV deal, but in fact they are laughing all the way to the bank. After we sold the house, my wife cried and I laughed all the way to the bank.
See also: all, bank, laugh, way

not break the bank

to not be too expensive And at £12.99 a bottle, this is a champagne that won't break the bank.
See also: bank, break

be laughing all the way to the bank

  (informal)
if someone is laughing all the way to the bank, they have made a lot of money very easily, often because someone else has been stupid If we don't take this opportunity, you can be sure our competitors will and they'll be laughing all the way to the bank.
See also: all, bank, laugh, way

bank on

Rely on, count on. For example, You can bank on Molly's caterer to do a good job. This expression alludes to bank as a reliable storage place for money. [Late 1800s]
See also: bank, on

break the bank

Ruin one financially, exhaust one's resources, as in I guess the price of a movie won't break the bank. This term originated in gambling, where it means that a player has won more than the banker (the house) can pay. It also may be used ironically, as above. [c. 1600]
See also: bank, break

laugh all the way to the bank

Also, cried all the way to the bank. Exult in a financial gain from something that had either been derided or thought worthless. For example, You may not think much of this comedian, but he's laughing all the way to the bank. Despite the seeming difference between laugh and cry, the two terms are virtually synonymous, the one with cry being used ironically and laugh straightforwardly. [c. 1960]
See also: all, bank, laugh, way

bank on

v.
To rely on someone or something: You can bank on her to get the job done when it has to be done quickly. I wouldn't bank on the bus arriving on time.
See also: bank, on

bank

1. n. money; ready cash. (From bankroll.) I can’t go out with you. No bank.
2. n. a toilet. (Where one makes a deposit.) Man, where’s the bank around here?
3. tv. to gang up on and beat someone. (An intransitive version is bank on someone.) They banked the kid and left him moaning.

bank on someone

in. to beat up on someone. (The transitive version is bank.) Freddy was banking on Last Card Louie and almost killed him.
See also: bank, on

break the bank

To require more money than is available.
See also: bank, break

laugh all the way to the bank

To take glee in making money, especially from activity that others consider to be unimpressive or unlikely to turn a profit.
See also: all, bank, laugh, way
References in classic literature ?
Jurgis had only about sixty dollars in the bank, and the slack season was upon them.
But the waters of the pond rose up suddenly, overflowed the bank where the couple stood, and dragged them under the flood.
There I reflected on the incidents which had taken place in our excursion to the Manaar Bank.
In the course of the day, they saw something moving on the bank among the trees, which they mistook for game of some kind; and, being in want of provisions, pulled toward shore.
Meanwhile Achilles sprang from the bank into mid-stream, whereon the river raised a high wave and attacked him.
On the following morning (May 26th), as they were all on shore, breakfasting on one of the beautiful banks of the river, they observed two canoes descending along the opposite side.
Thin they wint back, an' it cost 'em two an' thirty days to beat to the Banks again.
By diving I could evade the bullets and, swimming vigorously, reach the bank, take to the woods and get away home.
So I told his lie with unction at my bank, and made due arrangements for the reception of his chest next morning.
The University covered the left bank of the Seine, from the Tournelle to the Tour de Nesle, points which correspond in the Paris of to-day, the one to the wine market, the other to the mint.
So saying, he came softly to the river bank and laying him down upon the grass, peered over the edge and down below.
Napoleon looked up and down the river, dismounted, and sat down on a log that lay on the bank.
Gradually they approached nearer and nearer to the bank on the right-hand side, so that the light which covered them became definitely green, falling through a shade of green leaves, and Mrs.
After a time they repassed the Quadling house and the man was still standing on the bank.
In the mud along the bank the ape-man saw the footprints of the two he sought, but there was neither boat nor people there when he arrived, nor, at first glance, any sign of their whereabouts.