bang

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bang

1. n. a bit of excitement; a thrill; some amusement. We got a bang out of your letter.
2. n. the degree of potency of the alcohol in liquor. This stuff has quite a bang!
3. n. an injection of a drug; any dose of a drug. (Drugs.) If Albert doesn’t have a bang by noon, he gets desperate.
4. tv. & in. to inject a drug. (Drugs.) They were in the back room banging away.
5. n. a drug rush. (Drugs.) One snort and the bang will knock you over.
6. tv. to copulate [with] someone. (Usually objectionable.) Did you bang her? Huh? Tell me!
7. n. an act of copulation. (Usually objectionable.) One bang was never enough for Wallace T. Jones. He was never satisfied.
See:
References in classic literature ?
I shouted as I banged my fist down upon the table--banged it with such violence that a frightened waiter came running towards us.
Deesa took a tent-peg and banged Moti Guj ten times on the nails.
Once more the door banged, and a slight, slim-built boy perhaps fifteen years old, a half-smoked cigarette hanging from one corner of his mouth, leaned in over the high footway.
On passing the door of the front room (it was originally meant for a drawing-room but a bed for Blunt was put in there) I banged with my fist on the panel and shouted: "I am obliged to go out.
he continued, flushing up at the sight of the bitter sneer upon the man's face, "it is not part of my duties to my client, but here's a hunting crop handy, and I think I shall just treat myself to--" He took two swift steps to the whip, but before he could grasp it there was a wild clatter of steps upon the stairs, the heavy hall door banged, and from the window we could see Mr.
And there were days that packed into the space of a few hours the concentrated essence of a music-hall knock-about sketch, an earthquake, a football scrummage, and the rush-hour on the Tube; when the office was full of shouting men, when strange figures dived in and out and banged doors like characters in an old farce, and Harold, the proud office-boy, lost his air of being on the point of lunching with a duke at the club and perspired like one of the proletariat.
They have to be humoured; wait--" He banged the hand that held the pen against the back of the bench.