baggage

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excess baggage

1. Literally, travel luggage that exceeds the dimensions of size or weight normally allowed on a plane or train, usually requiring a fee for it to be allowed onboard. My suitcase was only slightly over the weight limit, but the airline clerk still insisted on labeling my suitcase as excess baggage and slapping me with a fine.
2. Any person or thing that is unnecessary or unwanted and thus is or becomes burdensome. I know it's ungenerous, but Martin's younger brother has been nothing but excess baggage since we agreed to let him live with us.
3. A personal history, emotional disposition, or traumatic experience that is or becomes debilitating or burdensome in life. He carried the excess baggage of his abusive parents with him for years after leaving home. Her reclusiveness has become real excess baggage for her in recent months.
See also: baggage, excess

bag and baggage

With all of one's possessions. You need to be out of your dorm room, bag and baggage, by Monday morning.
See also: and, bag, baggage

bag and baggage

 and part and parcel
with one's luggage; with all one's possessions. Sally showed up at our door bag and baggage one Sunday morning. All right, if you won't pay the rent, out with you, bag and baggage! Get all your stuff—part and parcel—out of here!
See also: and, bag, baggage

bag and baggage

All of one's belongings, especially with reference to departing with them; completely, totally. For example, The day he quit his job, John walked out, bag and baggage. Originating in the 1400s, this phrase at first meant an army's property, and to march off bag and baggage meant that the departing army was not leaving anything behind for the enemy's use. By the late 1500s, it had been transferred to other belongings.
See also: and, bag, baggage

bag and baggage

with all your belongings.
See also: and, bag, baggage

ˌbag and ˈbaggage

with all your belongings: If you don’t pay the rent, you’ll be thrown out, bag and baggage.
See also: and, bag, baggage

bag and baggage

1. With all one's belongings.
2. To a complete degree; entirely.
See also: and, bag, baggage
References in classic literature ?
The tents, and the men wrapped in their blankets and bivouacking on skins in the open air, surrounded the baggage at night.
So I told the folks I reckoned I would go up to the town and fetch down my baggage.
Let them unload two of the sumpter-mules, and put the baggage behind two of the serfs.
By this time the change of baggage was hastily achieved; for the single word ``outlaws'' rendered every one sufficiently alert, and the approach of twilight made the sound yet more impressive.
He sends for your theater tickets, and pays for them; he sends for any possible article you can require, be it a doctor, an elephant, or a postage stamp; and when you leave, at last, you will find a subordinate seated with the cab-driver who will put you in your railway compartment, buy your tickets, have your baggage weighed, bring you the printed tags, and tell you everything is in your bill and paid for.
A breastwork was thrown up of saddles, baggage, and camp furniture, and all hands waited anxiously for daylight.
They have taken the baggage and all the guns,' yelled the Frenchman, firing blindly into the twilight.