bad news


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bad news

1. An unwelcome thing or person, trouble. For example, That fire was bad news; we were underinsured for the damage, or No one wants Mary on the board-she's bad news. This term transfers literal bad news-the report of an unhappy recent event-to an unwanted or undesirable individual or circumstance. [Slang; 1920s]
2. The amount charged for something, as in Waiter, bring our check-I want to see the bad news. [Slang; 1920s]
See also: bad, news

bad news

1. n. the bill for something. Here comes the bad news.
2. mod. unpleasant; unfortunate; repellent. That poor guy is really bad news.
See also: bad, news
References in periodicals archive ?
The technique of getting lots of bad news over with in one day was made famous by US drama The West Wing, in the episode Take Out the Trash Day.
Between each of these above-mentioned sentences you would warn that there is more bad news, pause before giving it, and check back that it has been understood and the family and/or patient is ready for more.
Legg and Kate Sweeny wrote that the process of giving or getting bad news is difficult for most people, particularly when news-givers feel unsure about how to proceed with the conversation.
Let us hope the curse of Bad News does not continue to dog the poor animal.
While this refers to the "normal" reactions that family members may have, it also includes the sometimes overlooked idea that not everybody, or everybody's family, deals with bad news in the same way.
But the escalation in oil prices spells more bad news for motorists, already facing record diesel prices of 143.
If so, this may need to be addressed gently over several discussions before breaking the bad news.
HOME AND AWAY THE whole cast receive some bad news when they are told no one is watching anymore.
BAD NEWS No 2: Next we heard how Great Train Robber Ronnie Biggs is expected to make a killing from a book about his prison experiences.
Even in the midst of all the bad news, good news exists.
Yet recent research showed that 40 per cent of doctors admitted to a habit of "toning down" bad news to a patient in order to spare themselves the pressure of an emotionally-charged response.
You understand, Bad News, that I was raised Roman Catholic and Protestant.
Parents receiving bad news from professionals have reported that some professionals appeared tense, hurried, distracted, and even took phone calls during the conversation (Ablon, 2000; Nissenbaum et al.
The bad news is he only stayed five hours and then came right home.
He dreams of winning bike races, makes some unexpected new friends, and falls in love with beautiful Silvia, only to find he's too afraid to deliver bad news to her.