back out


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

back out

 (of something)
1. Lit. [for someone or something] to move out of something backwards. The rabbit tried to back out of its burrow. The rabbit backed out.
2. Fig. [for someone] to withdraw from something, such as an agreement, negotiations, an argument, etc. Are you going to try to back out of our agreement? You won't back out, will you?
See also: back, out

back someone or something out (from something)

to back someone or something out of something. Judy backed out the car from the parking place. She backed it out from its space.
See also: back, out

back out (of something)

to refuse to do something agreed to earlier I said I'd help, and I can't back out now.
See also: back, out

back out

1. Move or retreat backwards without turning; same as back away, def. 1.
2. Also, back out of something. Withdraw from a situation, or break an agreement or engagement. For example, After the announcement appeared in the papers, Mary found it doubly difficult to back out of her engagement to Todd . [Early 1800s] Also see go back on.
See also: back, out

back out

v.
1. To move backward out of some region: The bear backed out of the cave.
2. To move or drive something backward out of some region: The sergeant backed the tank out of the trench. We picked up the heavy sofa and slowly backed it out of the living room and onto the porch.
3. To decide not to keep a commitment or promise: They backed out of the deal at the last minute. We had a plan to finish the work together, but they backed out.
See also: back, out