back and fill


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back and fill

1. To move a ship's sails in an alternating fashion to accommodate the wind in a narrow channel. We need to back and fill the sails in order to pass through this channel.
2. To be indecisive. You need to make a decision and stick to it—quit backing and filling!
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back and fill

Fig. to act indecisively; to change one's direction repeatedly; to reverse one's course. (Originally nautical, referring to trimming the sails so as to alternately fill them with wind and release the wind, in order to maneuver in a narrow space.) The president spent most of his speech backing and filling on the question of taxation. The other candidate was backing and filling on every issue, depending on whom she was addressing.
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back and fill

Vacillate, be undecided, as in This measure will never be passed if the town meeting continues to back and fill. This term comes from sailing ships, where it signifies alternately backing and filling the sails, a method used when the wind is running against a ship in a narrow channel. The sail is hauled back against the wind and braced so that the tide or current carries the ship forward against the wind. Then the sail must be swung around and filled, to keep the ship on course. The term's figurative use for indecisiveness dates from the mid-1800s.
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back and fill

OLD-FASHIONED
If someone backs and fills, they keep changing their opinion or failing to make a decision. They backed and filled for over six weeks until I told them that I would do the job myself. Note: People also talk about backing and filling to refer to this kind of behaviour. The markets are nervous, so we are likely to see some backing and filling.
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back and fill

1 go in contrary directions 2 be indecisive, temporize, vacillate. chiefly North American
The expression was originally nautical: to back is to sail backwards, to fill , to sail forwards (from the notion of the wind filling the sails).
2 2003 Commonweal Even as she wants to advance boldly, therefore, she is required by the evidence to back and fill, leaving the reader with a bewildering combination of affirmation and qualification.
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back and fill

1. Nautical To maneuver a vessel in a narrow channel by adjusting the sails so as to let the wind in and out of them in alteration.
2. To vacillate in one's actions or decisions.
See also: and, back, fill