References in classic literature ?
I'd look nice sitting up to Aunt Eliza and yelling out that this was Uncle Jim and 'tother Cousin Sarah's twins, wouldn't I?
He went into the spare room and walked all over Aunt Eliza's things on the bed.
In other words, the books themselves having been sent back, select extracts from the books, copied by different hands, and all addressed as letters to my aunt, were, some to be sent by post, and some to be distributed about the house on the plan I had adopted on the previous day.
The first servant who went in after me would conclude that my aunt had dropped it, and would be specially careful to restore it to her.
There is look in her eyes that goes to my heart, for it shows that she feels the need of what none of us can give her a mother," said Aunt Jessie, with tears in her own bright eyes at the thought of her boys being left, as Rose was, to the care of others.
I cannot help feeling that I, who have had a daughter of my own, can best bring up a girl; and I am very much surprised that George did not entrust her to me," observed Aunt Myra, with an air of melancholy importance, for she was the only one who had given a daughter to the family, and she felt that she had distinguished herself, though ill-natured people said that she had dosed her darling to death.
And with this final expression of contempt for Sally's greenness, Aunt Chloe whipped the cover off the bake-kettle, and disclosed to view a neatly-baked pound-cake, of which no city confectioner need to have been ashamed.
They wanted me to come to supper in the house," said George; "but I knew what was what too well for that, Aunt Chloe.
Then, abruptly, her aunt opened a door and ascended another stairway.
Then she saw that her aunt had thrown open a door at the right.
You forgot your duty when you listened to what my aunt said.
The purpose which had taken a foremost place in Emily's mind rested on the firm foundation of her love and pity for her aunt.
He jumped up, and, throwing his arm round the neck of the spinster aunt, imprinted upon her lips numerous kisses, which after a due show of struggling and resistance, she received so passively, that there is no telling how many more Mr.
Dick,' said my aunt, 'don't be a fool, because nobody can be more discreet than you can, when you choose.
We don't mind for ourselves," said her aunt, stroking the little girl's head tenderly; "but we love you as if you were our own child, and we are heart-broken to think that you must also endure poverty, and work for a living before you have grown big and strong.