at (one's) own peril

(redirected from at their own peril)

at (one's) own peril

Done with the foreknowledge or forewarning that there is implied danger, especially of loss of life, which one must accept as one's own responsibility. Those who skydive do so at their own peril.
See also: own
References in classic literature ?
I walked with the utmost circumspection, to avoid treading on any stragglers who might remain in the streets, although the orders were very strict, that all people should keep in their houses, at their own peril.
I have always been baffled by the NCUA's rush to eliminate threats to the fund at their own peril.
They do so not just at their own peril, but at our nation's.
But the tug-of-war that continues to play itself out is a sign of a simple and basic truth, which Iranian leaders can ignore at their own peril.
Fun yet deeply serious, this book shows that people ignore the urge to play at their own peril.
Explaining her moves, Arroyo said, "Governments that delay action against illegal drugs, or regard it as a routine police matter, do so at their own peril.
America's love of "shock" has grown wearisome -- and shock's purveyors make their millions at their own peril.
There are many in the kingdom who loved her parents and care for Princess Ben, but they must do so at their own peril.
If people write them off, it is at their own peril," Norton-Knight said after playing for the Central Coast Rays in the Australian Rugby Championship at the weekend.
Let them think we are not up for this one at their own peril.
Yet she is smart and sensitive enough not to stick to her own divine afflatus--a trap that some writers of spiritual books succumb to, at their own peril.
Chief executives who underestimate the ability of Chinese enterprises to become viable competitors do so at their own peril.
The United States and other democracies allow this war-without-quarter to escalate at their own peril.
Institutions that ignore real estate issues in their communities or fail to use assets strategically do so at their own peril, says John Fry, president of Franklin and Marshall College (Pa.