associate with

associate someone or something with someone or something

to link someone or something [in one's mind] to someone or something else. (Something and someone can occur in all possible combinations.) I always associate Walter with pizza for some reason. I associate pizza with stringy cheese.
See also: associate

associate with someone

to be friendly with someone; to be acquainted with someone socially in a work setting. We seek to associate with persons like ourselves. I like to associate with interesting people.
See also: associate

associate with

1. To keep company with someone or some group: They are very snobbish and don't associate with people from our side of town.
2. To link something in the mind with something else: People often associate sunny weather with happiness.
See also: associate
References in classic literature ?
associate with the people whom you would be likely to meet?
Linton commissioned me to take the boy home early, on Catherine's pony; and, said he - 'As we shall now have no influence over his destiny, good or bad, you must say nothing of where he is gone to my daughter: she cannot associate with him hereafter, and it is better for her to remain in ignorance of his proximity; lest she should be restless, and anxious to visit the Heights.
Potter wouldn't ever associate with me, but I reckon he'll be glad to when he finds out what I am.
The only new book which I remember to have read in those two or three years at Dayton, when I hardly remember to have read any old ones, was the novel of 'Jane Eyre,' which I took in very imperfectly, and which I associate with the first rumor of the Rochester Knockings, then just beginning to reverberate through a world that they have not since left wholly at peace.
For the folks of Oz knew the kitten had tried to commit the crime, and that only an accident had prevented her from doing so; therefore even the Hungry Tiger preferred not to associate with her.
But the idea of absolute insanity which we all associate with the very name of an Asylum, had, I can honestly declare, never occurred to me, in connection with her.
Further, he ought to entertain the people with festivals and spectacles at convenient seasons of the year; and as every city is divided into guilds or into societies,[*] he ought to hold such bodies in esteem, and associate with them sometimes, and show himself an example of courtesy and liberality; nevertheless, always maintaining the majesty of his rank, for this he must never consent to abate in anything.
There is then in all persons a natural impetus to associate with each other in this manner, and he who first founded civil society was the cause of the greatest good; for as by the completion of it man is the most excellent of all living beings, so without law and justice he would be the worst of all, for nothing is so difficult to subdue as injustice in arms: but these arms man is born with, namely, prudence and valour, which he may apply to the most opposite purposes, for he who abuses them will be the most wicked, the most cruel, the most lustful, and most gluttonous being imaginable; for justice is a political virtue, by the rules of it the state is regulated, and these rules are the criterion of what is right.
In short, we want to associate with them, while still living out our lives as laypeople.
Full browser ?