assimilate

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assimilate someone or something into something

to cause someone or something to be absorbed into something. (As when a person or thing joins a group.) We sought to assimilate Arnold into the community. The manager had to assimilate the new policies into the list of current ones. They assimilated themselves into the general population.
See also: assimilate

assimilate with some people

to join or mix in with people and become accepted by them. It's easy for Karen to assimilate with new people. I want to assimilate rapidly with the other people in my class.
See also: assimilate, people
References in classic literature ?
Here the class was reciting a lesson from an abstruse text-book on economics, reciting it by rote, with so obvious a failure to assimilate it that the waste of labour was pitiful.
It would be no small business to remain herself, and yet to assimilate such an establishment.
He dwelt on this: and said several times that unless they tried to assimilate themselves to their conquerors, they must be swept away before the strides of civilised society.
Stem dry weight was decreased in the treatment of the removal of upper leaves of cab compared to control which indicates the deficiency of assimilates and the incapability of leaves in supplying enough assimilates.
The findings suggest that companies, auditors and regulators still face an uphill battle to ensure that the marketplace understands and assimilates the information that will be disclosed in Sec.
The promises of freedom, conquest, empire, and transformation offered by the Western seem available to a black man only if he thoroughly assimilates whiteness and abandons any sense of responsibility to other blacks.
The brain then assimilates and changes the thoughts and ideas which it has absorbed and changes them into character and personality.
Then special software called Fusion Agent assimilates the complex inputs so the computer may respond to subtle signals that humans routinely use to communicate with one another.
More to the point, doggedly pasting the same stencil over every work of literature tends to obscure precisely what Bloom claims to value above all else in great literature: "strangeness, a mode of originality that either cannot be assimilated, or that so assimilates us that we cease to see it as strange.