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Related to askance: eventually, painstakingly, look askance
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look askance upon (someone or something)

To view or regard something in a disapproving or distrustful manner. Such is the state of politics these days that even the most patriotic citizens tend to look askance upon the manner in which congress conducts business. I know that the Ivy League students may look askance upon a country bumpkin such as myself, but I will show them that I have the mettle to be their equal.
See also: askance, look, upon

look askance at someone or something

Fig. to be surprised or shocked at someone or something. The teacher looked askance at the student who had acted so rudely. Everyone had looked askance at her efforts as an artist.
See also: askance, look

look askance at somebody/something

(slightly formal) also look at somebody/something askance
to consider someone or something in a disapproving way The courts have tended to look askance at many of these claims. Our teachers looked at us askance.
See also: askance, look

look askance

View with mistrust, as in They looked askance at him when he said he'd just made a million in the stock market. The precise feeling conveyed by this expression has varied since it was first used in the 1500s, from envy to contempt to suspicion, although the literal meaning was "look obliquely, with a side glance." The present sense dates from about 1800. Also see look sideways.
See also: askance, look
References in classic literature ?
On this Helen, daughter of aegis-bearing Jove, sat down, and with eyes askance began to upbraid her husband.
Her beautiful eyes glanced askance at her husband's face, and her own assumed the timid, deprecating expression of a dog when it rapidly but feebly wags its drooping tail.
Number Twelve rose, looking askance at the bull whip.
The "freshettes" stood about in detached groups of two or three, looking askance at each other; the "freshies," wiser in their day and generation, had banded themselves together on the big staircase of the entrance hall, where they were shouting out glees with all the vigor of youthful lungs, as a species of defiance to their traditional enemies, the Sophomores, a few of whom were prowling loftily about, looking properly disdainful of the "unlicked cubs" on the stairs.
Rocke continued, "people were inclined to look a little askance at her, that has all gone by.
Taking a last whiff of his cigarette he threw it down, stepped on it, and letting the smoke escape through his moustache and looking askance at the horse that was coming up, began to tuck in his sheepskin collar on both sides of his ruddy face, clean-shaven except for the moustache, so that his breath should not moisten the collar.
The officer looked askance at the impassible figure of his companion, and grew pale: he was an honest man as well as a brave one.
In the plantation house at Meringe, always the several white men had looked askance at the many blacks who toiled for them and belonged to them.
As England grew Puritan, the people began to look askance at the theater, for the Puritans had always been its enemies.
Anne set the card up against the jugful of apple blossoms she had brought in to decorate the dinnertable--Marilla had eyed that decoration askance, but had said nothing-- propped her chin on her hands, and fell to studying it intently for several silent minutes.
Doctor," as she called Anne, with blind fervor, looked rather jealously askance at Marilla at first.
And as to looking askance to another woman, he's safe enough for that too, while I live, for he worships the very ground I tread on.
For all that he was displeased enough, looked at me askance, and grumbled when he looked.
He looks askance at the lady who waits in the shop, and ties up the cards again in their envelope of whitey-brown paper, and hands them to the poor widow and Miss Clapp, who had never seen such beautiful things in her life, and had been quite confident that the man must give at least two guineas for the screens.
Sergey Ivanovitch, while he kept up a conversation with their hostess, had one ear for his brother, and he glanced askance at him.