arrive

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Related to arriving: leaving

*ahead of one's time

Fig. having ideas or attitudes that are too advanced to be acceptable in the present. (*Typically: be ~; think ~.) Sue's grandmother was ahead of her time in wanting to study medicine.
See also: ahead, of, time

*ahead of time

beforehand; before the announced time. (*Typically: arrive ~; get there ~; leave ~; show up ~.) If you show up ahead of time, you will have to wait. Be there ahead of time if you want to get a good seat.
See also: ahead, of, time

arrive at a decision

 and reach a decision
to make a decision; decide. Have you arrived at a decision yet? We will reach a decision tomorrow.
See also: arrive, decision

arrive back

(some place) Go to back (some place).
See also: arrive, back

arrive

(some place) at some time to reach some place at a particular time. We will arrive at the border at noon. They arrived at seven o'clock in the evening.

arrive (somewhere) (up)on the stroke of some time

 and arrive (somewhere) at the stroke of some time
to reach a place at a particular instant of time.(Upon is more formal and less commonly used than on.) She arrived home on the stroke of midnight. We all arrived at the stroke of two.
See also: arrive, of, on, stroke, time

arrive (somewhere) (up)on the stroke of some time

 and arrive (somewhere) at the stroke of some time
to reach a place at a particular instant of time. (Upon is more formal and less commonly used than on.) She arrived home on the stroke of midnight. We all arrived at the stroke of two.
See also: arrive, of, on, stroke, time

arrive

(somewhere) at the stroke of some time Go to arrive (somewhere) (up)on the stroke of some time.

arrive (somewhere) (up)on the stroke of some time

 and arrive (somewhere) at the stroke of some time
to reach a place at a particular instant of time. (Upon is more formal and less commonly used than on.) She arrived home on the stroke of midnight. We all arrived at the stroke of two.
See also: arrive, of, on, stroke, time

arrive (up)on the scene (of something)

 and arrive at the scene (of something)
to reach the location of an event in progress. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on and at.) The police arrived on the scene of the crime. They arrived upon the scene of a frightening accident. What did they do when they arrived at the scene?
See also: arrive, on, scene

*back

(at someone) repaying someone for a bad deed. (*Typically: get ~; have ~.) Tom called me a jerk, but I'll get back at him. I don't know how I'll get back for her insult, but I will.

*back (some place)

returned to some place; at some place again. (*Typically: be ~; get ~; arrive ~.) I can't wait till we get back home. When will we get back? Is it much farther?

come on the scene

 and arrive on the scene 
1. Lit. to arrive at a place. When we came on the scene, the ambulances were already there. The police arrived on the scene and began directing traffic.
2. Fig. to become part of a situation. She thought she was in love with Harry until Bob came on the scene.
See also: come, on, scene

have arrived

to have reached a position of power, authority, or prominence. Jane saw her picture on the cover of the magazine and felt that she had finally arrived. When I got an office with a window, I knew that I had arrived.
See also: arrive, have

*in a body

Fig. as a group of people; as a group; in a group. (*Typically: arrive some place ~; go ~; leave ~; reach some place ~; travel ~.) The tour members always traveled in a body.
See also: body

*in force

 
1. [of a rule or law] currently valid or in effect. (*Typically: be ~.) Is this rule in force now? The constitution is still in force.
2. Fig. in a very large group. (*Typically: arrive ~; attack ~.) The entire group arrived in force. The mosquitoes will attack in force this evening.
See also: force

*in the (very) nick of time

Fig. just in time; at the last possible instant; just before it's too late. (*Typically: arrive ~; get there ~; happen ~; reach something ~; Save someone ~.) The doctor arrived in the nick of time. The patient's life was saved. I reached the airport in the very nick of time and made my flight.
See also: nick, of, time

It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive.

Prov. You should enjoy the process of doing something, rather than anticipate the result of doing it. Bill: I can't wait till I get my high school diploma. Fred: You should concentrate on enjoying high school instead. It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive.
See also: arrive, better, travel

*on a wing and a prayer

Fig. to arrive or fly in with one's plane in very bad condition. (Sometimes used fig. of other vehicles. *Typically: come (in) ~; arrive ~.) Finally we could see the plane through the smoke, coming in on a wing and a prayer.
See also: and, on, prayer, wing

arrive at something

to come to a decision or agreement about something after serious thought or discussion The town council needs to explain how they arrived at their plan for future development of the town.
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of arrive at (to come to a place)
See also: arrive

in force

in effect and in use The law has been in force for two years.
Usage notes: used when referring to laws, rules, agreements, and systems
See also: force

(just) in the nick of time

at the last possible moment A man walking his dog saw her fall into the river and pulled her out just in the nick of time.
See also: nick, of, time

ahead of time

before something happens We'd better buy our tickets ahead of time if we want to avoid waiting in a long line.
See also: ahead, of, time

ahead of your time

also before your time
having very modern ideas The inventor was years ahead of his time in realizing the importance of being able to record sound. Taylor's ideas have been before his time on many occasions.
See also: ahead, of, time

in the nick of time

at the last possible moment
Usage notes: A nick was a mark on a stick which was used in the past to measure time.
We got there just in the nick of time. A minute later and she'd have left.
See also: nick, of, time

on a wing and a prayer

if you do something on a wing and a prayer, you do it hoping that you will succeed although you are not prepared enough for it With scarcely any funding and a staff of six, they operate on a wing and a prayer.
See also: and, on, prayer, wing

ahead of time

Earlier, sooner, as in The meeting was scheduled for three o'clock, but most people arrived ahead of time. [Early 1900s]
See also: ahead, of, time

arrive at

Reach an objective, as in We arrived at the party right on time, or It took Harry only a few minutes to arrive at a solution. [Early 1500s]
See also: arrive

in force

1. In full strength, in large numbers, as in Demonstrators were out in force. This usage originally alluded to a large military force. [Early 1300s]
2. Operative, binding, as in This rule is no longer in force. This usage originally alluded to the binding power of a law. [Late 1400s]
See also: force

in the nick of time

Also, just in time. At the last moment, as in The police arrived in the nick of time, or He got there just in time for dinner. The first term began life as in the nick and dates from the 1500s, when nick meant "the critical moment" (a meaning now obsolete). The second employs just in the sense of "precisely" or "closely," a usage applied to time since the 1500s. Also see in time, def. 1.
See also: nick, of, time

on the scene, be

Also, arrive or come on the scene . Be or arrive where an action or event occurs, as in They won't have a wild party because their parents will be on the scene, or Once Bob arrives on the scene, you can expect fireworks. Alluding to the theatrical scene, where a drama is being played, this phrase has been used more loosely since the early 1700s.
See also: on

arrive at

v.
1. To reach or come to some place: Because of the snowstorm, we arrived at the airport three hours late.
2. To come to some conclusion or decision: I think you're right, but how did you arrive at that answer?
See also: arrive

back

n. one’s support or second in a fight. (From back-up.) I need a back I can depend on.

in force

1. In full strength; in large numbers: Demonstrators were out in force.
2. In effect; operative: a rule that is no longer in force.
See also: force

in the nick of time

Just at the critical moment; just in time.
See also: nick, of, time
References in periodicals archive ?
Also launching on 9 February 2012 is Spirit's service between Dallas/Fort Worth and Atlanta, leaving at 14:57 and arriving in Atlanta at 18:07, return services will leave Atlanta at 11:57 and arrive in Dallas/Fort Worth at 13:22.
40: The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh leave Buckingham Palace, arriving at the abbey at 10.
25: Members of the Royal Family leave Buckingham Palace for the abbey, arriving at 10.
1010: Prince William and his best man Prince Harry leave Clarence House for Westminster Abbey, arriving at the Great West Door at 1015.
NNA - The first direct flight arriving from Abidjan safely touched ground at Rafik Hariri International airport on Monday.
The bus finally arrived at 08:28 and left the stop at 08:30, arriving in Pritchett's Road at 08:51 in close formation with another 21 vehicle - an hour and six minutes after I arrived in town.
The refrigerator is stocked with your favorite foods and the mail is already arriving at your new address.
NILAND - Flights of snow and Canada geese have started arriving in big numbers at refuges in Southern California as the migration of northern birds head south to spend the winter.
The IRS, on the other hand, allowed the loss as an itemized deduction in arriving at taxable income.
Escaping the civil war in Burundi, they traveled to Congo and Tanzania before arriving in Nairobi.
The passenger, still in the vehicle, was apprehended at the scene by arriving officers from the Pendergrass Police Department and deputies from the Jackson County Sheriff's Department.
For example, in a cultural history class, the focus might be on the legacy of the peoples of Latin America, Asia, and the Caribbean since it is a well-known fact that the greater majority of immigrants to the United States are arriving from those regions.
Most of the journey was smooth and incident-free, with the tram arriving on time at all destinations.
The person arriving early is seen first even though his or her appointment is not till later.