arrive

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*ahead of one's time

Fig. having ideas or attitudes that are too advanced to be acceptable in the present. (*Typically: be ~; think ~.) Sue's grandmother was ahead of her time in wanting to study medicine.
See also: ahead, of, time

*ahead of time

beforehand; before the announced time. (*Typically: arrive ~; get there ~; leave ~; show up ~.) If you show up ahead of time, you will have to wait. Be there ahead of time if you want to get a good seat.
See also: ahead, of, time

arrive at a decision

 and reach a decision
to make a decision; decide. Have you arrived at a decision yet? We will reach a decision tomorrow.
See also: arrive, decision

arrive back

(some place) Go to back (some place).
See also: arrive, back

arrive

(some place) at some time to reach some place at a particular time. We will arrive at the border at noon. They arrived at seven o'clock in the evening.

arrive (somewhere) (up)on the stroke of some time

 and arrive (somewhere) at the stroke of some time
to reach a place at a particular instant of time.(Upon is more formal and less commonly used than on.) She arrived home on the stroke of midnight. We all arrived at the stroke of two.
See also: arrive, of, on, stroke, time

arrive (somewhere) (up)on the stroke of some time

 and arrive (somewhere) at the stroke of some time
to reach a place at a particular instant of time. (Upon is more formal and less commonly used than on.) She arrived home on the stroke of midnight. We all arrived at the stroke of two.
See also: arrive, of, on, stroke, time

arrive

(somewhere) at the stroke of some time Go to arrive (somewhere) (up)on the stroke of some time.

arrive (somewhere) (up)on the stroke of some time

 and arrive (somewhere) at the stroke of some time
to reach a place at a particular instant of time. (Upon is more formal and less commonly used than on.) She arrived home on the stroke of midnight. We all arrived at the stroke of two.
See also: arrive, of, on, stroke, time

arrive (up)on the scene (of something)

 and arrive at the scene (of something)
to reach the location of an event in progress. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on and at.) The police arrived on the scene of the crime. They arrived upon the scene of a frightening accident. What did they do when they arrived at the scene?
See also: arrive, on, scene

*back

(at someone) repaying someone for a bad deed. (*Typically: get ~; have ~.) Tom called me a jerk, but I'll get back at him. I don't know how I'll get back for her insult, but I will.

*back (some place)

returned to some place; at some place again. (*Typically: be ~; get ~; arrive ~.) I can't wait till we get back home. When will we get back? Is it much farther?

come on the scene

 and arrive on the scene 
1. Lit. to arrive at a place. When we came on the scene, the ambulances were already there. The police arrived on the scene and began directing traffic.
2. Fig. to become part of a situation. She thought she was in love with Harry until Bob came on the scene.
See also: come, on, scene

have arrived

to have reached a position of power, authority, or prominence. Jane saw her picture on the cover of the magazine and felt that she had finally arrived. When I got an office with a window, I knew that I had arrived.
See also: arrive, have

*in a body

Fig. as a group of people; as a group; in a group. (*Typically: arrive some place ~; go ~; leave ~; reach some place ~; travel ~.) The tour members always traveled in a body.
See also: body

*in force

 
1. [of a rule or law] currently valid or in effect. (*Typically: be ~.) Is this rule in force now? The constitution is still in force.
2. Fig. in a very large group. (*Typically: arrive ~; attack ~.) The entire group arrived in force. The mosquitoes will attack in force this evening.
See also: force

*in the (very) nick of time

Fig. just in time; at the last possible instant; just before it's too late. (*Typically: arrive ~; get there ~; happen ~; reach something ~; Save someone ~.) The doctor arrived in the nick of time. The patient's life was saved. I reached the airport in the very nick of time and made my flight.
See also: nick, of, time

It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive.

Prov. You should enjoy the process of doing something, rather than anticipate the result of doing it. Bill: I can't wait till I get my high school diploma. Fred: You should concentrate on enjoying high school instead. It is better to travel hopefully than to arrive.
See also: arrive, better, travel

*on a wing and a prayer

Fig. to arrive or fly in with one's plane in very bad condition. (Sometimes used fig. of other vehicles. *Typically: come (in) ~; arrive ~.) Finally we could see the plane through the smoke, coming in on a wing and a prayer.
See also: and, on, prayer, wing

arrive at something

to come to a decision or agreement about something after serious thought or discussion The town council needs to explain how they arrived at their plan for future development of the town.
Etymology: based on the literal meaning of arrive at (to come to a place)
See also: arrive

in force

in effect and in use The law has been in force for two years.
Usage notes: used when referring to laws, rules, agreements, and systems
See also: force

(just) in the nick of time

at the last possible moment A man walking his dog saw her fall into the river and pulled her out just in the nick of time.
See also: nick, of, time

ahead of time

before something happens We'd better buy our tickets ahead of time if we want to avoid waiting in a long line.
See also: ahead, of, time

ahead of your time

also before your time
having very modern ideas The inventor was years ahead of his time in realizing the importance of being able to record sound. Taylor's ideas have been before his time on many occasions.
See also: ahead, of, time

in the nick of time

at the last possible moment
Usage notes: A nick was a mark on a stick which was used in the past to measure time.
We got there just in the nick of time. A minute later and she'd have left.
See also: nick, of, time

on a wing and a prayer

if you do something on a wing and a prayer, you do it hoping that you will succeed although you are not prepared enough for it With scarcely any funding and a staff of six, they operate on a wing and a prayer.
See also: and, on, prayer, wing

ahead of time

Earlier, sooner, as in The meeting was scheduled for three o'clock, but most people arrived ahead of time. [Early 1900s]
See also: ahead, of, time

arrive at

Reach an objective, as in We arrived at the party right on time, or It took Harry only a few minutes to arrive at a solution. [Early 1500s]
See also: arrive

in force

1. In full strength, in large numbers, as in Demonstrators were out in force. This usage originally alluded to a large military force. [Early 1300s]
2. Operative, binding, as in This rule is no longer in force. This usage originally alluded to the binding power of a law. [Late 1400s]
See also: force

in the nick of time

Also, just in time. At the last moment, as in The police arrived in the nick of time, or He got there just in time for dinner. The first term began life as in the nick and dates from the 1500s, when nick meant "the critical moment" (a meaning now obsolete). The second employs just in the sense of "precisely" or "closely," a usage applied to time since the 1500s. Also see in time, def. 1.
See also: nick, of, time

on the scene, be

Also, arrive or come on the scene . Be or arrive where an action or event occurs, as in They won't have a wild party because their parents will be on the scene, or Once Bob arrives on the scene, you can expect fireworks. Alluding to the theatrical scene, where a drama is being played, this phrase has been used more loosely since the early 1700s.
See also: on

arrive at

v.
1. To reach or come to some place: Because of the snowstorm, we arrived at the airport three hours late.
2. To come to some conclusion or decision: I think you're right, but how did you arrive at that answer?
See also: arrive

back

n. one’s support or second in a fight. (From back-up.) I need a back I can depend on.

in force

1. In full strength; in large numbers: Demonstrators were out in force.
2. In effect; operative: a rule that is no longer in force.
See also: force

in the nick of time

Just at the critical moment; just in time.
See also: nick, of, time
References in classic literature ?
On the tenth day of March following, I, and ten of my men, were conducted by forty Indians to Detroit, where we arrived the thirtieth day, and were treated by Governor Hamilton, the British commander at that post, with great humanity.
In the afternoon we walked over the Great Scheideck to Grindelwald, stopping to pay a visit to the Upper glacier by the way; but we were again overtaken by bad HOGGLEBUMGULLUP and arrived at the hotel in a SOLCHE a state that the landlord's wardrobe was in great request.
When he arrived home his wife and children received him with the greatest joy.
As the ceremony was completed the Wizard King arrived.
Fogg was on English ground, it was for my interest to detain him there until my warrant of arrest arrived.
Every one had arrived almost before the usual hour, and was conversing on the melancholy event which was to attract the attention of the public towards one of their most illustrious colleagues.
In five minutes they arrived at the spot whence the noise had proceeded, and then restraining their horses, they advanced cautiously.
Once I remember the party arrived at midnight; but the unseasonableness of the tour did not repress the impatience of the islanders.
At length it reached the province of Damerghou; there the three travellers parted, and Barth took the road to Kano, where he arrived by dint of perseverance, and after paying considerable tribute.
The twelve rowers in the other did not, at first, perceive this maneuver, for they continued to urge on their boat so vigorously that it arrived quickly within musket- shot.
The Wizard and the Shaggy Man next arrived, and soon after appeared Omby Amby, dressed in his best uniform.
On the Monday, a plowboy from Vale Regis arrived at Monksmoor.
She had arrived early that morning, and she was then in the Reading Room.
Cummings reined in his horse when he arrived in front of him, gave him a pleasant salutation and invited him to a seat in the vehicle--"if you are going my way," he added.
All the hurrahs, carried upward upon the sonorous waves of the immense acoustic tube, arrived with the sound of thunder at its mouth; and the multitude ranged round Stones Hill heartily united their shouts with those of the ten revelers hidden from view at the bottom of the gigantic Columbiad.