arm in arm


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*arm in arm

Fig. [of persons] linked or hooked together by the arms. (*Typically: go ~; Stroll ~; walk ~.) The two lovers walked arm in arm down the street. They skated arm in arm around the rink.
See also: arm

arm in arm

With one person's arm linked around another's; also, closely allied or intimate, as in Both couples walked arm in arm around the grounds of the estate, and This candidate is arm in arm with the party's liberal wing. The literal expression dates from the late 1300s, when Chaucer so used it: "They went arm in arm together into the garden" ( Troilus and Cressida). The figurative usage dates from about 1600. Also see hand in hand.
See also: arm

arm in arm

With arms linked together: They walked across the beach arm in arm.
See also: arm
References in classic literature ?
The Admiral left the house a few minutes later and Lady Conyers walked arm in arm with her daughter into the pleasant little morning-room which looked out upon the Square.
Dorothy was a general favorite, and she walked arm in arm with the Scarecrow, who was beloved by all.
Out they came forthwith; Mr Witherden, who was short, chubby, fresh-coloured, brisk, and pompous, leading the old lady with extreme politeness, and the father and son following them, arm in arm.
They had started down the street, arm in arm, the young man pushing Jurgis along, half dazed.
Now, it happened that the Father of the Marshalsea was sauntering towards the Lodge at the moment when they were coming out of it, entering the prison arm in arm.
They used to saunter, arm in arm, up and down the alleys and walks of the garden.
Weston, who had called in for half a minute, in order to hear that his son was very handsome, knew nothing of their plans; and it was an agreeable surprize to her, therefore, to perceive them walking up to the house together, arm in arm.