appearance

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Related to appearances: Appearances can be deceiving

to all appearances

According to the way things appear or how one sees things; as is apparent to observation. To all appearances, Daren seemed a very happy, outgoing fellow, so his nervous breakdown took many people by surprise. The giant corporation was, to all appearances, doing quite well, but just last week it filed for bankruptcy.
See also: all, appearance

appearances can be deceiving

Appearances do not always convey accurate information. That house sure looks beautiful on the outside, but appearances can be deceiving. What did the inspector say about the foundation? Sure, she seems nice, but appearances can be deceiving.
See also: appearance, can, deceive

by all appearances

According to the way things appear or how one sees things; as is apparent to observation. By all appearances, Daren seemed a very happy, outgoing fellow, so his outburst took many people by surprise. The giant corporation was by all appearances doing quite well, but just last week it filed for bankruptcy.
See also: all, appearance, by

keep up appearances

To act as though everything is normal or fine in times of trouble. I tried very hard to keep up appearances as I fell further and further into credit card debt.
See also: appearance, keep, up

keep up

1. Literally, to physically hold or maintain something in an upright position or at a certain level. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is sometimes used between "keep" and "up." Do you think these pushpins will keep up the posterboard? Hopefully these braces will keep the structure up until we can come up with a more permanent solution.
2. To prevent someone from sleeping by making noise, distracting them, etc. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is often used between "keep" and "up." Please stop shouting! You'll keep up your mother, and she has an early day tomorrow. No, I don't mind if you read with the light one—it won't keep me up. Thinking about all the problems in the world keeps me up at night sometimes.
3. To maintain or adhere to an agreement. How can I trust you if you never keep up your end of the bargain?
4. To maintain something to an expected or acceptable level. Keeping up the exterior of the house has been a lot more work than I expected. Were you able to keep up your garden this year? I'd like to keep up my painting, but it's tough with two young kids.
5. To move or progress at the same rate as others. My leg was hurt, but I was able to keep up with the rest of the team during our run. Keeping up with the go-getters in this office is a real challenge, but I think you're up to it. You can follow me if you want, but try to keep up.
6. To continue doing something in the way one has been doing it. Often used as an imperative, especially in the phrases "keep it up" and "keep up the good work." Wow, these look great. Keep up the good work, James! I can't continue working these long hours. If I keep it up, I'll get burned out. If you keep this up, you're going to get expelled.
7. To stay informed about something or in touch with someone by following the latest developments or communicating regularly. It's so hard to keep up with the news these days, especially when a huge story breaks every day. Have you been keeping up with your cousins? What's Mary Kate up to these days?
See also: keep, up

make an appearance

To visit or appear at some place or event for a brief amount of time, especially as a courtesy or for the sake of politeness. We really should make an appearance at my cousin's party—it would be pretty rude not to while we're in town like this. The movie visited the hospital when a young fan dying of leukemia asked her to make an appearance.
See also: appearance, make

put in an appearance

To visit or appear at some place or event for a brief amount of time, especially as a courtesy or for the sake of politeness. We really should put in an appearance at my cousin's party—it would be pretty rude not to while we're in town like this. The movie visited the hospital when a young fan dying of leukemia asked her to put in an appearance.
See also: appearance, put

Appearances can be deceiving.

Prov. Things can look different from the way they really are. Edward seems like a very nice boy, but appearances can be deceiving. Jane may look like she doesn't understand you, but she's really extremely bright. Appearances can be deceiving.
See also: Appearance, can, deceive

by all appearances

apparently; according to what one sees or how things seem. She is, by all appearances, ready to resume work. By all appearances, we ought to be approaching the airport.
See also: all, appearance, by

keep someone up

 
1. Lit. to hold someone upright. Try to keep him up until I can get his bed made. Keep her up for a few minutes longer.
2. Fig. to prevent someone from going to bed or going to sleep. I'm sorry, was my trumpet keeping you up? The noise kept us up.
See also: keep, up

keep something up

 
1. Lit. to hold or prop something up. Keep your side of the trunk up. Don't let it sag. Keep up your side of the trunk.
2. Fig. to continue doing something. I love your singing. Don't stop. Keep it up. Please keep up your singing.
3. Fig. to maintain something in good order. I'm glad you keep the exterior of your house up. You keep up your house nicely.
See also: keep, up

keep up appearances

to make things look all right whether they are or not. We must keep up appearances even if it means little sacrifices here and there. Things may be unpleasant, but we will keep up appearances.
See also: appearance, keep, up

keep up

 (with someone or something)
1. Lit. to advance at the same rate as someone or something; to be just as productive as someone or something. Don't work so fast. I can't keep up with you. You're running so fast that I cannot keep up with you. I don't make enough money to keep up with your spending.
2. Fig. to pay attention to the news about someone or something. I don't see the Smiths a lot since they moved, but I keep up with them by phone. I try to keep up with current events.
See also: keep, up

make an appearance

to appear; to appear in a performance. We waited for thirty minutes for the professor to make an appearance, then we went home. The famous singing star made an appearance in Detroit last August.
See also: appearance, make

put in an appearance (at something)

to appear briefly at some place or at some event. I only wanted to put in an appearance at the reception, but I ended up staying for two hours. Do we have to stay a long time, or can we just put in an appearance?
See also: appearance, put

keep up

1. Also, keep up with. Proceed at the same pace, continue alongside another, as in We try to keep up with the times. [First half of 1600s] This usage, also put as keep pace, appears in the phrase keeping up with the Joneses, which was coined in 1913 by cartoonist Arthur R. Momand for the title of a series in the New York Globe. It means "trying to match the lifestyle of one's more affluent neighbors or acquaintances." For example, Their buying a new van is just another attempt to keep up with the Joneses.
2. Support, sustain, as in They're trying to keep up their spirits while they wait for news of the crash. [Late 1600s] Also see keep one's chin up.
3. Maintain in good condition, as in Joan really kept up the property. [Mid-1500s] This usage also appears in the idiom keep up appearances, meaning "to maintain a good front, make things look good even if they're not," as in She was devastated by his bad prognosis but is trying hard to keep up appearances for their children . [Mid-1700s]
4. Persevere, carry on, prolong, as in Keep up the good work, or How long will this noise keep up? [Early 1500s] Also see keep it up.
5. Also, keep up with; keep up on. Stay in touch, remain informed. For example, Ann and I haven't seen each other since college, but we keep up through our annual Christmas letters , or We subscribe to three papers so as to keep up on current events. [c. 1900]
6. keep someone up. Cause someone to remain out of bed, as in He's keeping up the children beyond their bedtime. [Mid-1700s]
See also: keep, up

put in an appearance

Also, make an appearance. Be present, especially for a short time, as in We were hoping the rock star would put in an appearance, but she didn't show up, or She was tired and didn't want to go to the party, but decided she had to make an appearance. [Second half of 1600s]
See also: appearance, put

keep up appearances

COMMON
1. If you keep up appearances, you pretend that a situation is good and as it should be, even though it is not. I was determined to keep up appearances by pretending nothing was wrong. The marriage was failing, but we tried to keep up appearances for the sake of the children.
2. If you keep up appearances, you try to behave and dress in a way that people expect of you, even if you can no longer afford it. His parents' obsession with keeping up appearances haunted his childhood.
See also: appearance, keep, up

keep up appearances

maintain an impression of wealth or well-being.
See also: appearance, keep, up

to (or by) all appearances

as far as can be seen.
1991 Eric Lax Woody Allen To all appearances, theirs was a unique case of sibling amity.
See also: all, appearance

keep up apˈpearances

hide the true situation and pretend that everything is still going well: She’s lost all her money, but she’s determined to keep up appearances.
See also: appearance, keep, up

to all apˈpearances

if something/somebody is judged only by what you can see: The house was, to all appearances, empty.
See also: all, appearance

keep up

v.
1. To preserve or sustain something: We kept up the appearance of friendship even though we were mad at each other. The couple kept appearances up even though they had separated.
2. To maintain something in good condition: He did a good job of keeping up the property. The community kept up the old church.
3. To persevere in doing something; carry on doing something: I asked her to stop yelling, but she kept it up. Keep up the good work!
4. To continue at a steady level or pace, especially a significant level or pace: The snow kept up all day.
5. To maintain a value or level equal to that of something, even as that value or level increases: The number of new TVs that arrived didn't keep up with the demand. The scarcity of available land keeps up the demand for it.
6. To match some competitor or perceived competitor: I kept up with the leader of the race until the very end, and so I came in second place.
7. To cause someone to remain awake: The noise from the construction site kept me up all night.
8. keep up on To remain adequately informed: He loved to keep up on the gossip by reading the tabloids.
See also: keep, up

put in an appearance

To attend a social engagement, especially for a short time.
See also: appearance, put
References in classic literature ?
1) Cases in which only certain appearances of the object change, while others, and especially appearances from places very near to the object, do not change;
2) Cases where all, or almost all, the appearances of the object undergo a connected change.
It is the frequency of the latter kind of change, and the comparatively simple nature of the laws governing the simultaneous alterations of appearances in such cases, that have made it possible to treat a physical object as one thing, and to overlook the fact that it is a system of particulars.
Captain Cook, in his third voyage, remarks, that the sailors gave to this appearance the name of sea-sawdust.
On the coast of Chile, a few leagues north of Concepcion, the Beagle one day passed through great bands of muddy water, exactly like that of a swollen river; and again, a degree south of Valparaiso, when fifty miles from the land, the same appearance was still more extensive.
Captain Colnett remarks, that this appearance is very common among the Galapagos Islands, and that the directions of the bands indicate that of the currents; in the described case, however, the line was caused by the wind.
Thus the appearance of new forms and the disappearance of old forms, both natural and artificial, are bound together.
We know not at all precisely what are all the conditions most favourable for the multiplication of new and dominant species; but we can, I think, clearly see that a number of individuals, from giving a better chance of the appearance of favourable variations, and that severe competition with many already existing forms, would be highly favourable, as would be the power of spreading into new territories.
The royal phantom also carried a ghostly manuscript round its truncheon, to which it had the appearance of occasionally referring, and that, too, with an air of anxiety and a tendency to lose the place of reference which were suggestive of a state of mortality.
But his greatest trials were in the churchyard: which had the appearance of a primeval forest, with a kind of small ecclesiastical wash-house on one side, and a turnpike gate on the other.
I don't know what he had looked like, except a funeral; with the addition of a large Danish sun or star hanging round his neck by a blue ribbon, that had given him the appearance of being insured in some extraordinary Fire Office.
The carpet - of Saxony material - is quite half an inch thick, and is of the same crimson ground, relieved simply by the appearance of a gold cord (like that festooning the curtains) slightly relieved above the surface of the ground, and thrown upon it in such a manner as to form a succession of short irregular curves - one occasionally overlaying the other.
He rattled and clanked a little, as he moved, but in the main he seemed to be most cleverly constructed, and his appearance was only marred by the thick coating of polishing-paste that covered him from head to foot.
This was accomplished in a short time, and when the emperor returned his nickel-plated body shone so magnificently that the Scarecrow heartily congratulated him on his improved appearance.
The Scarecrow now presented a very respectable appearance, and although in no way addicted to vanity he was quite pleased with himself and strutted a trifle as he walked.