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anyone in their right mind

Anyone of a sound, rational mind. Usually used to set up a context in which any sane person would or could do, say, or think a certain thing. Anyone in their right mind can see that poverty affects the entire world.
See also: anyone, mind, right

anyone who is anybody

All the most famous or important people in society. Usually used to indicate something as being glamorous, trendy, or chic, which all such famous people have, do, or are attending. I hear that the gala in New York City is going to be a star-studded event. Anyone who is anybody will be there!
See also: anybody, anyone, who

burst the bubble of (someone)

To upset or destroy someone's belief, conviction, or mood by delivering news that runs contrary to what he or she holds to be true. I hate to burst the bubble of everyone here, but this period of economic success will not last long.
See also: bubble, burst, of

Anyone I know?

 and Anybody I know?
a coy way of asking who? Sally: Where were you last night? Jane: I had a date. Sally: Anyone I know? Bill: I've got a date for the formal next month. Henry: Anybody I know?
See also: anyone

It's anybody's guess

No one knows, so anyone's guess is as good as anyone else's. A: When will the messenger be here? B: It's anybody's guess.
See also: guess

run something up

1. Lit. to raise or hoist something, such as a flag. Harry ran the flag up the flagpole each morning. Will you please run up the flag today?
2. Fig. to cause something to go higher, such as the price of stocks or commodities. A rumor about higher earnings ran the price of the computer stocks up early in the afternoon. They ran up the price too high.
3. Fig. to accumulate indebtedness. I ran up a huge phone bill last month. Walter ran up a bar bill at the hotel that made his boss angry.
4. to stitch something together quickly. She's very clever. I'm sure she can run up a costume for you. The seamstress ran up a party dress in one afternoon.
See also: run, up

run up (to someone or something)

to run as far as someone or something and stop; to run to the front of someone or something. I ran up to the mailman and said hello to him. I ran up and said hello.
See also: run, up

run up something

to cause something to reach a high level or large amount Carol ran up a huge phone bill last month, calling the UK and Mexico.
See also: run, up

anybody who is anybody

if anybody who is anybody is doing something, all the most famous and important people are doing that thing Anybody who is anybody will be at the Queen's birthday celebrations.
See also: anybody, who

be anybody's guess

if a piece of information is anybody's guess, no one knows it Why Becky left is anybody's guess. 'So what's going to happen now?' 'That's anybody's guess.'
See also: guess

run up

1. Make or become greater or larger, as in That offer will run up the price of the stock. [Late 1500s]
2. Accumulate, as in She ran up huge bills at the florist. [First half of 1700s]
3. Sew rapidly, as in I can run up some new curtains for the kitchen. [Mid-1800s]
4. Raise a flag, as in Let's run up the flag in time for the holiday. This usage, originating in the navy about 1900, gave rise to the slangy phrase, Let's run it up the flagpole and see if anybody salutes, meaning, "Let's try this out." The latter originated about 1960 as advertising jargon.
See also: run, up

run up

1. To cause some debt to accumulate: Don't run up such a big bill next time you go out to eat! He has been running a large debt up for months.
2. To increase some value: The craze for this company's stock will run up its price. The bidders ran the price up to $100.
See also: run, up
References in classic literature ?
They wouldn't 'a' let a nigger steal anybody else's corn and never done anything to him.
In short, I was not a favourite there with anybody, not even with myself; for those who did like me could not show it, and those who did not, showed it so plainly that I had a sensitive consciousness of always appearing constrained, boorish, and dull.
Only you'd been into my house oftener than anybody else, and so you came into my head.
She seldom listened to anybody for more than half a minute, and never attended to Mary at all.
But if anybody asks any questions upstairs, just you take no notice, and turn the talk to something else, and I'll be obliged to you.
She is of a temper to do a great deal for anybody she really interests herself about, and she will force you to do justice to your natural powers.
Allen; and after looking about them in vain for a more eligible situation, were obliged to sit down at the end of a table, at which a large party were already placed, without having anything to do there, or anybody to speak to, except each other.
I never knew anybody catch anything, up the Thames, except minnows and dead cats, but that has nothing to do, of course, with fishing
I should only mind if there were a law obliging me to take any piece of blood and beauty that she or anybody else recommended.
Perhaps his mother doesn't want him to marry anybody," suggested Anne.
When he inquired if anybody knew the Countess Narona, he was answered by something like a shout of astonishment.
It isn't fair to dare anybody to do anything so dangerous.
Miss Reade hasn't told me that she was going to marry anybody.
Is there anybody,' demanded Mr Pluck, mysteriously, 'anybody you know, that Mrs Wititterly's profile reminds you of?
No--nor anybody else," retorted Miss Polly, with meaning emphasis.