anger


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Related to anger: Anger problems

burst with (an emotion)

Of an emotion, to be so filled up with something as to be unable to contain it. I was bursting with anger after they fired me from my job. My kids burst with joy when we told them we were going to the theme park over the weekend.
See also: burst

never let the sun go down on your anger

Always make amends before the day is done; do not go to sleep angry. I know you're mad at him right now, but you should never let the sun go down on your anger.
See also: anger, down, let, never, on, sun

bristle with rage

 and bristle with anger; bristle with indignation
Fig. to demonstrate one's anger, rage, or displeasure with a strong negative response. (Alludes to a dog or cat raising the hair on its back in anger or as a threat.) She was just bristling with anger. I don't know what set her off. Walter bristled with rage as he saw the damage to his new car.
See also: bristle, rage

express one's anger

to allow a release or expression of anger, such as through angry words, violence, or talking out a problem. Don't keep your emotions inside of you. You have to learn to express your anger. Bob expresses his anger by yelling at people.
See also: anger, express

fire someone with anger

 and fire someone with enthusiasm; fire someone with hope; fire someone with expectations
Fig. [for someone's words] to fill someone with eagerness or the desire to do something. The speech fired the audience with enthusiasm for change. We were fired with anger to protest against the government.
See also: anger, fire

flame with anger

 and flame with resentment; flame with lust; flame with vengeance
Fig. [for someone's eyes] to "blaze" or seem to communicate a particular quality or excitement, usually a negative feeling. His eyes flamed with resentment when he heard Sally's good news. Her eyes flamed with hatred.
See also: anger, flame

flash with anger

 and flash with recognition; flash with eagerness
[for someone's eyes] to "glimmer" or seem to communicate a particular quality or excitement. Her green eyes flashed with anger. Ellen's eyes flashed with recognition when she saw me.
See also: anger, flash

more in sorrow than in anger

Saddened rather than infuriated by someone's behavior. For example, When Dad learned that Jack had stolen a car, he looked at him more in sorrow than in anger . This expression first appeared in 1603 in Shakespeare's Hamlet (1:2), where Horatio describes to Hamlet the appearance of his father's ghost: "A countenance more in sorrow than in anger."
See also: anger, more, sorrow

the cage of anger

n. a prison. (Streets.) The judge put JoJo into the cage of anger for a three-year stretch.
See also: anger, cage, of
References in classic literature ?
And Minerva said, "I come from heaven, if you will hear me, to bid you stay your anger.
Son of Atreus, check your anger, I implore you; end this quarrel with Achilles, who in the day of battle is a tower of strength to the Achaeans.
Therefore, Patroclus, bring her and give her to them, but let them be witnesses by the blessed gods, by mortal men, and by the fierceness of Agamemnon's anger, that if ever again there be need of me to save the people from ruin, they shall seek and they shall not find.
To contain anger from mischief, though it take hold of a man, there be two things, whereof you must have special caution.
For raising and appeasing anger in another; it is done chiefly by choosing of times, when men are frowardest and worst disposed, to incense them.
That man shall fall so low that when people look at the abject ruin my anger shall have wrought, they will be forced to confess at last and at least that I am indeed greater than he.
To have reversed a previous arrangement and declined to go out would have been a show of persistent anger which Dorothea's conscience shrank from, seeing that she already began to feel herself guilty.
You are too late, Djor Kantos," she cried in mock anger.
Her first proceeding was to have a cry of anger and shame and disappointment.
He will think I have failed him and he will go away hot with anger against me.
Suppose that a man thinks he has done a wrong to another, the nobler he is the less able is he to feel indignant at any suffering, such as hunger, or cold, or any other pain which the injured person may inflict upon him--these he deems to be just, and, as I say, his anger refuses to be excited by them.
for in this verse Homer has clearly supposed the power which reasons about the better and worse to be different from the unreasoning anger which is rebuked by it.
The parson now began to triumph in the success of his peace-making endeavours, and proceeded to read a lecture against anger, which might perhaps rather have tended to raise than to quiet that passion in some hasty minds.
The squire took no notice of this story, nor perhaps of anything he said; for he interrupted him before he had finished, by calling for a tankard of beer; observing (which is perhaps as true as any observation on this fever of the mind) that anger makes a man dry.
Maggie, almost choked with mingled grief and anger, left the room, and took her old place on her father's bed.