an old wives' tale

an old wives' tale

a piece of advice or an idea which a lot of people believed in the past but which we now know is wrong It's an old wives' tale that drinking alcohol before you go to bed helps you sleep.
See also: old, tale
References in periodicals archive ?
GARY C ARY CRUDEN SOME voters could leave it until later in the day to cast vote if an old wives' tale is to be believed.
We didn't want to find out but the midwife was convinced it was a girl due to an old wives' tale - apparently if the heart beats faster it's a girl.
This week's winner is Pauline O'Dowd, of Nottingham, who says: "I thought it was an old wives' tale that yucca plants like tea.
Some also say you should place a cold object on the neck base, which is also an old wives' tale.
It's an old wives' tale that cows lie down when it's about to rain.
There's an old wives' tale that if you get heartburn during your pregnancy your baby will be born with a lot of hair - I had really bad heartburn.
I think it's an old wives' tale - it's just what your mother told you but nobody really knows.
There's an old wives' tale in that country that the team who take the pitch first always loses.
She thought it was an old wives' tale when people told her that if a contractor says a job is going to take six weeks, it really means 12 weeks.
It's not just an old wives' tale, according to Cardiff Met Office.
It is an old wives' tale that mayonnaise causes food to spoil, because mayonnaise is high in acid and acid retards bacteria growth," Wilson said.
RE: SMACKING: ``Spare the rod and spoil the child'' is not an old wives' tale as stated by Sue Woolmore, NSPCC Public Policy Adviser for the North (Daily Post, November 9 ).
THE wise advice to "feed a cold and starve a fever" may be more than just an old wives' tale, it was reported today.
The String Test is an old wives' tale that uses the movement of a needle and thread to "predict" how many children a woman will have and the gender of each child in birth order.
Although the proposition sounds like an old wives' tale, Shoghag Lajinian, chief resident at the SUNY Health Science Center of Brooklyn, N.