to some degree

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to some degree

Also, to a certain degree; to some or a certain extent ; to a degree or an extent . Somewhat, in a way, as in To some degree we'll have to compromise, or To an extent it's a matter of adjusting to the colder climate. The use of degree in these terms, all used in the same way, dates from the first half of the 1700s, and extent from the mid-1800s.
See also: degree
References in classic literature ?
Another of these magi constructed (of like material) a creature that put to shame even the genius of him who made it; for so great were its reasoning powers that, in a second, it performed calculations of so vast an extent that they would have required the united labor of fifty thousand fleshy men for a year.
28} Another had cultivated his voice to so great an extent that he could have made himself heard from one end of the world to the other.
If you take the affairs of another person so to heart, and suffer with her to such an extent, I do not wonder that you yourself are unhappy.
To such an extent was this disease that for those who know that Quasimodo has existed, Notre-Dame is to-day deserted, inanimate, dead.
My curiosity was aroused to such an extent that I made inquiry as to who the "Governor" was, and soon found that he was a coloured man who at one time had held the position of Lieutenant-Governor of his state.
So tensely was he strung, that a bunch of quail, exploding into flight from under his horse's nose, startled him to such an extent that automatically, instantly, he had reined in and fetched the carbine halfway to his shoulder.
But the Hazel-nut child, who was the most active little creature, climbed up the horse's tail and began to bite it on the back, enraging the creature to such an extent that it paid no attention to the direction the robber tried to make it go in, but galloped straight home.
The diaper includes a main torso part having an extent defined by an elastic banded torso receiving aperture at its upper end for receiving a torso, a pair of elastic banded leg receiving apertures at its lower end, and a crotch portion generally between said leg receiving apertures.
Inflation has diminished the purchasing power of our money to such an extent that nickels and pennies are now worth more melted down than their face value.