an Indian summer

an Indian summer

 
1. a period of warm weather which sometimes happens in early autumn Both the UK and Ireland have been enjoying an Indian summer over the past few weeks.
2. a successful or pleasant period in someone's life, especially towards the end of their life The book describes the last 20 years of Churchill's life, including his Indian summer as prime minister between 1951 and 1955.
See also: Indian, summer
References in periodicals archive ?
TEESSIDE may be enjoying the sunshine but sadly it is NOT an Indian Summer, according to weather experts.
British Weather Services senior meteorologist Jim Dale added: "Just when you thought summer was all over, an Indian summer is incoming.
However those hoping for an Indian Summer may be disappointed as a low pressure system is expected to start to move in from the west over the weekend, bringing the risk of some rain.
AFTER a wet summer, the North East could finally be getting some sunshine - but don't call it an Indian Summer.
An Indian Summer track was being used to introduce an Alan Whicker programme about paragliding.
The warm start to September prompted questions about whether it qualified as an Indian summer.
Shame, for an Apache frost and an Indian summer somehow balance the weather lore books rather splendidly
Perhaps not an Indian summer at this time of year but fingers crossed for perhaps an Indian spring.
EXPECTATIONS of sunshine and long hot days may have been washed away by record rainfall this summer, but gardeners as nature's greatest optimists, have high hopes for an Indian Summer.
Meanwhile, we'll look for an Indian summer soon, to tide us over.
As we are in the throes of an Indian Summer the Co-operative has Fairtrade Chilean Merlot Ros 2010/11 at pounds 4.
IT is way too early in the calendar for our classic definition of an Indian summer but this warm spell does carry some of the traits - clear blue skies, calm and mellow.
BRITAIN will bask in an Indian summer this week with temperatures set to soar to as high as 27C, weather forecasters predicted.
It simply didn't exist, Perhaps now the schools have gone back, We may get an Indian summer, like 2006.
In the increasingly global world of business thinking, an American spring could be followed by an Indian summer.