amok


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Related to amok: Run amok

go amok

1. To behave or run around in a wild, unruly, out-of-control manner; to be or become crazy or chaotic. We tried to have some organized games for the kids, but they all started going amok as soon as they got here. The villagers were cleaning up debris for days after the bulls went amok through the streets.
2. To become bad or go awry; to get out of control; to go haywire. This whole operation has gone amok. I don't know how we can be expected to finish by the deadline under these conditions.
3. dated To rush around in a violent, murderous frenzy. (Note: This is the phrase's original specific meaning, taken from Malay. "Amok" also has an older alternative spelling, "amuck.") Fueled by alcohol and cocaine, Dave went amok when his wife told him she'd been seeing someone else. Luckily, a neighbor called the police when they heard such a commotion.
See also: amok, go

run amok

1. To behave or run around in a wild, unruly, out-of-control manner; to be crazy or chaotic. We tried to have some organized games for the kids, but as soon as they all got here they started running amok. The villagers were cleaning up debris for days after the bulls ran amok through the streets.
2. To become bad or go awry; to get out of control; to go haywire. This whole operation has run amok. I don't know how we can be expected to finish under the deadline in these conditions.
3. dated To rush around in a violent, murderous frenzy. This is the phrase's original meaning, taken from Malay. "Amok" also has an older alternative spelling, "amuck." Members of the warrior clan were known to run amok on the battlefield in a bloodthirsty frenzy.
See also: amok, run

run amok

 and run amuck
to go awry; to go bad; to turn bad; to go into a frenzy. (From a Malay word meaning to run wild in a violent frenzy.) Our plan ran amok. He ran amuck early in the school year and never quite got back on the track.
See also: amok, run

run amok

Also, run riot or wild . Behave in a frenzied, out-of-control, or unrestrained manner. For example, I was afraid that if I left the toddler alone she would run amok and have a hard time calming down , or The weeds are running riot in the lawn, or The children were running wild in the playground. Amok comes from a Malay word for "frenzied" and was adopted into English, and at first spelled amuck, in the second half of the 1600s. Run riot dates from the early 1500s and derives from an earlier sense, that is, a hound's following an animal scent. Run wild alludes to an animal reverting to its natural, uncultivated state; its figurative use dates from the late 1700s.
See also: amok, run

run amok

behave uncontrollably and disruptively.
Amok , formerly also spelt amuck , comes from the Malay word amuk , meaning ‘in a homicidal frenzy’, in which sense it was first introduced into English in the early 16th century.
1990 New York Review of Books Hersh's article is sensationalism run amok. It does no credit to him or to The New York Times Magazine .
See also: amok, run

run aˈmok

behave in a wild or uncontrolled way: The crowd ran amok through the city streets when they heard their leaders had been killed. Amok comes from the Malay word for ‘attack fiercely’.
See also: amok, run

run amok

(ˈrən əˈmək)
in. to go awry. (From a Malay word meaning to run wild in a violent frenzy.) Our plan ran amok.
See also: amok, run

run amok, to

To go crazy; to behave in a wild, frenzied manner. This term is based on the Malay word amok, meaning “a state of frenzy.” In England, however, it was at first spelled amuck, as in Andrew Marvell’s account (The Rehearsal Transposed, 1672): “Like a raging Indian . . . he runs a mucke (as they cal it there) stabbing every man he meets.”
See also: run
References in periodicals archive ?
Abad claimed he was only defending himself from Rodel Batangan, a villager who reportedly went amok on Sunday afternoon, Corpuz said.
Set in 1927, there are traces of It's a Mad, I Mad, Mad, Mad World in this Mel Brooks farce about a treasure hunt gone amok.
By restraining the action of an immune system protein that can run amok, scientists experimenting on mice have reversed the course of severe sepsis, an often-lethal blood infection that shuts down vital organs.
Things, identifiable and otherwise, run amok in Tom Burckhardt's work, all on pretty much equal footing.
If Halloween and All Saints' Day have had unusual traditions, All Souls' Day runs amok.
That's because memantine, rather than affecting acetylcholine, inhibits the action of glutamate, a brain chemical that runs amok in Alzheimer's patients.
Metaphorically, it's hard to know what still matters aesthetically in our world during one of its slightly more amok moments: What might provide continuity?
Although it shares a certain affinity with Hans Richter's whimsical and abstract Dada Heads, 1918, his cube is not a Suprematist object run amok and vulgarized, dumped into a democratic environment that points up its artificiality.
The p53 gene itself encodes a protein that signals cells to commit programmed suicide, or apoptosis, when their growth patterns run amok, as in cancer.