ambulance chaser


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ambulance chaser

1. A derogatory term for a person, usually a lawyer, who seeks out the scenes of accidents (where ambulances will respond) in order to profit in some way from those involved, often by encouraging them to engage in a lawsuit. The first person I met after my accident was an ambulance chaser who wanted to represent me in court. The guys at that towing company are real ambulance chasers.
2. By extension, a derogatory term for any lawyer. I can't believe I have to hire a lawyer. I don't trust any of those ambulance chasers!
See also: ambulance, chaser

ambulance chaser

a lawyer who hurries to the scene of an accident to try to get business from injured persons. The insurance companies are cracking down on ambulance chasers.
See also: ambulance, chaser

ambulance chaser

An attorney who seeks to profit from someone's injury or accident; also, an inferior lawyer. For example, Karen refused to join any law firm that included ambulance chasers. The practice of suing for damages on behalf of the injured person in exchange for a contingency fee-usually a large percentage of the amount so won-may be older, but this derogatory term began to be used for lawyers who actively sought out individuals injured in accidents who required an ambulance. [Slang; late 1800s]
See also: ambulance, chaser

an ambulance chaser

An ambulance chaser is a lawyer who contacts people who have been injured to try to get work by giving them legal advice. They describe Mr Edwards as a shameless ambulance chaser claiming that he makes money suing people. Note: This expression is used to express disapproval.
See also: ambulance, chaser

ambulance chaser

and chaser
1. n. a lawyer or entrepreneur who hurries to the scene of an accident to try to get the business of any injured persons. The insurance companies are cracking down on ambulance chasers. A chaser got here before the ambulance, even.
2. n. a derogatory term for any lawyer. (Also a rude term of address.) That ambulance chaser is trying to charge me for reaching his office when I called a wrong number! Three-hundred dollars an hour for what? You two-bit chaser!
See also: ambulance, chaser
References in periodicals archive ?
When you add to this the stories of insurance premiums increasing 5- fold and ambulance chasers putting on white coats and cruising the local A&E's signing up injured clients it's not at all surprising that the UK is seeing a huge backlash against the so called "compensation culture".
The fast lane is, well, obviously for people in a tearing hurry; motorists from Abu Dhabi, intimidating Hummer owners, ambulance chasers and those pretending to be American ranchers driving humungous SUVs.
The once-sleepy IUL market could likely become the next victim for bloodthirsty ambulance chasers.
You'll never look at ambulance chasers in the same way again.
These media guys think they run the show, but they're just a bunch of ambulance chasers.
Although Japan doesn't have ambulance chasers, it does have a strong ethic of corporate responsibility, and an injury caused by slipping on a wet floor can be expensive.
With subjects ranging from wild-eyed teen onlookers at a late-night slaying to glassy-eyed starlets at Hollywood movie premieres, Weegee was one of the first ambulance chasers.
The other thing I saw yesterday was a telephone directory in my hotel, and on the back page there was a huge ad for ambulance chasers.
Many clinicians also mistakenly see themselves as victims who can't do anything about the malpractice crisis and view plaintiffs' attorneys as greedy ambulance chasers.
you now cannot walk through Blaydon without being accosted by one of you ambulance chasers.
a construction magnate, told the Herald that the church will now err on the side of generosity for victims, even at the risk of "enticing ambulance chasers looking for a windfall.
No matter what precautions you may have taken, the ambulance chasers will soon be at your door.
Police reporters, he maintains, are "more blue collar than blue blood," typically young, under-trained, overworked beeper wearers who "traffic in human misery and deviance," loners and ambulance chasers who "do not have the patience or disposition to make good Cub Scout leaders and T-ball coaches.
When a jet plane goes down, you expect ambulance chasers (aka lawyers) to jump in with both feet.
Just as the Michael Jordans of the world are more visible than the thousands of athletes who don't make it, so are high-profile litigators more visible than ambulance chasers.