be in (one's) altitudes

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Related to altitude: altitude sickness

be in (one's) altitudes

obsolete To be inebriated. That gentleman becomes most uncivil when he is in his altitudes.
References in classic literature ?
Unconsciousness comes quickly at this altitude," she said quietly.
The motor started at a touch and purred sweetly, the buoyancy tanks were well stocked, and the ship answered perfectly to the controls which regulated her altitude.
Leaping for the altitude control Gahan pulled it wide.
It was a long shot, a dangerous shot, for unless one is accustomed to it, shooting from a considerable altitude is most deceptive work.
Momentarily, Jimmie was sullen with thoughts of a hopeless altitude where grew fruit.
Speed--that's what's needed, and so are the large sustaining surfaces for getting started and for altitude.
At an altitude of several hundred feet it straightened out and went due cast.
At an altitude of five hundred feet, the pigeon drove on over the town of Berkeley and lifted its flight to the Contra Costa hills.
Galileo explained the phenomena of the lunar light produced during certain of her phases by the existence of mountains, to which he assigned a mean altitude of
He assigned a height of 11,400 feet to the maximum elevations, and reduced the mean of the different altitudes to little more than 2,400 feet.
mount to such altitudes of imagination as he may be fitted to attain;
Mark Edwards, CEO of AIM Altitude said, This is a very exciting development for AIM Altitude as it combines our design, engineering and manufacturing expertise with the strengths of a major strategic aerospace business.
chamber, manufactured by Cincinnati Sub Zero, is capable of simulating Altitude environments of -5,000 to +100,000 feet, temperatures of -65C to +190C and a humidity range of 10% to 95% RH.
Jeep, a subsidiary of Chrysler LLC, is expanding its Altitude package for 2014.
They also caution that blood glucose measuring devices may be less accurate at high altitude.