all of


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all of something

only His book has sold all of 200 copies.
Usage notes: used to suggest that it would be foolish to expect more
See also: all, of

all of

1. The entire amount of something, as in The baby ate all of his cereal. This usage is relatively new, the word of being included only from about 1800 on.
2. No less than, at least, as in Although she looked much younger, she was all of seventy. [First half of 1800s]
See also: all, of

all of

Informal
Not more than: a conversation that took all of five minutes.
See also: all, of