alight

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Related to alights: flights

set the heather alight

To do wonderful or exciting things; to cause a great or remarkable sensation in the world; to be extremely exciting, popular, famous, renowned, etc. (Often used in the negative to indicate the opposite. Said especially in Scotland.) Primarily heard in UK. I wouldn't be too concerned with what he thinks of you. For all his money and education, he's hardly setting the heather alight, is he? When she was a child, Janet dreamed of setting the heather alight as a famous actress.
See also: alight, heather, set

set the Thames alight

To do wonderful or exciting things; to cause a great or remarkable sensation in the world; to be extremely exciting, popular, famous, renowned, etc. (Refers to the Thames river in London. Often used in the negative to indicate the opposite.) Primarily heard in UK. I wouldn't be too concerned with what he thinks of you. For all his money and education, he's hardly setting the Thames alight, is he? When she was a child, Janet dreamed of setting the Thames alight as a famous actress.
See also: alight, set, Thames

set the world alight

To do wonderful or exciting things; to cause a great or remarkable sensation in the world; to be extremely exciting, popular, famous, renowned, etc. (Often used in the negative to indicate the opposite.) I wouldn't be too concerned with what he thinks of you. For all his money and education, he's hardly setting the world alight, is he? As a girl, Janet dreamed of setting the world alight as a famous actress.
See also: alight, set, world

alight from something

to get off something; to get down off something. Almost three hundred people alighted from the plane.
See also: alight

alight (up)on someone or something

to land on something; [for a bird or other flying animal] to come to rest on something. (Upon is more formal than on.) A small bird alighted on the branch directly over my head. It alighted upon the branch and began to sing.
See also: alight

alight on

v.
1. To come down and settle on something; land on something: I watch the birds alight on the branches outside my window.
2. To discover or arrive at something by chance: The workers alighted on a simple solution to the problem.
See also: alight
References in classic literature ?
I still held her forcibly down with all my strength, like a prisoner who might escape; and I doubt if I even knew who she was, or why we had struggled, or that she had been in flames, or that the flames were out, until I saw the patches of tinder that had been her garments, no longer alight but falling in a black shower around us.
With a wavering movement, and emitting a tremulous radiance, the butterfly struggled, as it were, towards the infant, and was about to alight upon his finger; but while it still hovered in the air, the little child of strength, with his grandsire's sharp and shrewd expression in his face, made a snatch at the marvellous insect and compressed it in his hand.
And the bright glow of some inner fire that had been suppressed was again alight in her.
But I do not see how we can stop just now; for we might alight in a river, or on, the top of a steeple; and that would be a great disaster.
Allow the prisoner to alight, and let him see the black tulip; it is well worth being seen once.
Eventually they entered the town, which was all alight, but deserted; only the women and children remained, and they were off the streets.
I once had a sparrow alight upon my shoulder for a moment while I was hoeing in a village garden, and I felt that I was more distinguished by that circumstance than I should have been by any epaulet I could have worn.
Oh, Timothy, I--I think it was mean ter send me," chattered the suddenly frightened Nancy, as she turned and hurried to a point where she could best watch the passengers alight at the little station.
I alight wet and weary; no enthusiastic crowds press forward to greet their champion; the church bells are silent; the very name elicits no responsive feeling in their torpid bosoms.