aim

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Related to aiming: at long last, mistook

aim for something

 and aim at something
to strive toward a particular goal; to direct oneself or one's energies toward something. You should aim for success. Aim at getting this done on time.
See also: aim

Aim for the stars!

 and Reach for the stars!
Aspire to something!; Set one's goals high! Aim for the stars, son! Don't settle for second best. Set your sights high. Reach for the stars!
See also: aim

aim something at someone or something

to point or direct something at someone or something. Wally aimed the hose at Sarah and tried to soak her.
See also: aim

aim to do something

Rur. to intend to do something. I didn't aim to hurt your feelings, sugar, you know I didn't.
See also: aim

reach for the sky

 
1. and aim for the sky; shoot for the sky Fig. to set one's sights high. Reach for the sky! Go for it! You should always reach for the sky, but be prepared for not attaining your goals every time.
2. Fig. Inf. to put one's hands up, as in a burglary. The gunman told the bank teller to reach for the sky. Reach for the sky and give me all your money!
See also: reach, sky

take aim at someone or something

Fig. to prepare to deal with someone or something; to focus on someone or something. (Based on take aim (at someone, something, or an animal).) Now we have to take aim at the problem and try to get it solved. The critics took aim at the star of the musical and tore her to pieces.
See also: aim, take

take aim (at someone, something, or an animal)

to aim [something] at someone, something, or an animal. The hunter took aim at the deer and pulled the trigger. You must take aim carefully before you shoot.
See also: aim, take

We aim to please.

Fig. We try hard to please you. (Usually a commercial slogan, but can be said in jest by one person, often in response to Thank you.) Mary: This meal is absolutely delicious! Waiter: We aim to please. Tom: Well, Sue, here's the laundry detergent you wanted from the store. Sue: Oh, thanks loads. You saved me a trip. Tom: We aim to please.
See also: aim, please, we

aim to

Try or intend to do something, as in We aim to please, or She aims to fly to California. This term derives from aim in the sense of "direct the course of something," such as an arrow or bullet. [Colloquial; c. 1600]
See also: aim

reach for the sky

1. Set very high goals, aspire to the best, as in I'm sure they'll make you a partner, so reach for the sky. The sky here stands for high aspirations. Also see sky's the limit.
2. Put your hands up high, as in One robber held the teller at gunpoint, shouting " Reach for the sky!" This usage is always put as an imperative. [Slang; mid-1900s]
See also: reach, sky

take aim

Direct a missile or criticism at something or someone, as in Raising his rifle, Chet took aim at the squirrel but missed it entirely, or In his last speech the President took aim at the opposition leader. [Late 1500s]
See also: aim, take

aim at

v.
1. To point or direct something at someone or something: The archers drew back their arrows and aimed at the target.
2. To intend something for some purpose. Often used in the passive: We aimed our discussion at a solution to the financial problems. The new computer classes are aimed at teaching how computers work.
3. To be intended to achieve something: This new program aims at raising awareness about privacy issues.
4. To do or say something intended to affect someone or something. Used chiefly in the passive: Their sarcasm was aimed directly at me. The antismoking campaign was aimed at teenagers.
See also: aim

aim for the sky

and reach for the sky and shoot for the sky
in. to aspire to something; to set one’s goals high. (See a different sense at reach for the sky.) Shoot for the sky, son. Don’t settle for second best. Don’t settle for less. Reach for the sky!
See also: aim, sky

reach for the sky

verb
See also: reach, sky

reach for the sky

1. Go to aim for the sky.
2. in. (a command) to put one’s hands up, as in a robbery. The bank teller reached for the sky without having to be told.
See also: reach, sky

take aim

1. To aim a weapon or object to be propelled.
2. To direct criticism or one's attention at something.
See also: aim, take
References in classic literature ?
Meanwhile the suitors were throwing discs or aiming with spears at a mark on the levelled ground in front of Ulysses' house, and were behaving with all their old insolence.
One side of this space was occupied by the square front of the Province House, three stories high, and surmounted by a cupola, on the top of which a gilded Indian was discernible, with his bow bent and his arrow on the string, as if aiming at the weathercock on the spire of the Old South.
In the midst of the apparent confusion, they selected their victims with perfect judgment, generally aiming at the fattest of the cows, the flesh of the bull being nearly worthless, at this season of the year.
I fancy, Caroline, that Diplomacy is what Lord Illingworth is aiming at.
In all the devious tracings the course of a sailing-ship leaves upon the white paper of a chart she is always aiming for that one little spot - maybe a small island in the ocean, a single headland upon the long coast of a continent, a lighthouse on a bluff, or simply the peaked form of a mountain like an ant-heap afloat upon the waters.
He understood now what she had been aiming at from the beginning of the conversation.