aid

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Band-Aid solution

A quick and/or temporary solution to a problem that does not address or resolve the underlying cause of said problem. Taken from the Band-Aid brand of adhesive bandages. While offering free pizza to customers affected by the oil spill is a cute band-aid solution, the company has no plan in place to deal with the actual damage that it caused.
See also: solution

come to (someone's) aid

To provide assistance, support, or rescue to someone. Thank goodness the Coast Guard came to my aid, or I might have drowned out there. We were in serious financial trouble until Susan's mother came to our aid and helped us with some of our debt.
See also: aid, come

Band-Aid treatment

A method of covering up a problem, rather than solving it or getting to the root of it. Refers to the trademark for a brand of adhesive bandages. Honestly, I think this is just a Band-Aid treatment—we need to work harder and find a real solution.
See also: treatment

Band-Aid

A quick and usually ineffective solution to a problem that only addresses the symptom and not the root cause. Refers to the trademark for a brand of adhesive bandages. Primarily heard in US. Lowering educational standards in schools may increase graduation rates, but it does little more than slap a Band-Aid on a much deeper problem.

aid and abet someone

Cliché to help someone; to incite someone to do something, possibly something that is wrong. (Originally a legal phrase.) He was scolded for aiding and abetting the boys who were fighting.
See also: abet, aid, and

aid someone in doing something

to help someone do something. He aided her in fixing up the back bedroom.
See also: aid

aid someone in something

to help someone in some kind of trouble. Will you aid me in this difficulty?
See also: aid

be in aid of

to be intended to help, cure, or resolve. What is all this in aid of? I don't understand what your comments are in aid of.
See also: aid, of

bring something to someone's aid

to bring something with which to help someone. The officer brought medical supplies to our aid. An ambulance was brought to the injured man's aid.
See also: aid, bring

What's something in aid of?

  (British & Australian informal)
something that you say when you want to know why someone has done something I heard the shouting from the other side of the building. What was that in aid of? A present! What's this in aid of?
See also: aid

a Band-Aid

  (American)
a temporary solution to a problem, or something that seems to be a solution but has no real effect
Usage notes: Band-Aid is a trademark for a thin piece of sticky material used to cover small cuts on the body.
A few food and medical supplies were delivered to the region but it was little more than a Band-Aid. (American)

thirst-aid station

n. a place to purchase liquor. (Punning on first-aid station.) Let’s stop at the next thirst-aid station and get a snort.
See also: station
References in classic literature ?
Then Robin turned to Sir Richard of the Lea, and quoth he, "Now, Sir Richard, the church seemed like to despoil thee, therefore some of the overplus of church gains may well be used in aiding thee.
As an animal, Matilda was all right, full of life, vigour, and activity; as an intelligent being, she was barbarously ignorant, indocile, careless and irrational; and, consequently, very distressing to one who had the task of cultivating her understanding, reforming her manners, and aiding her to acquire those ornamental attainments which, unlike her sister, she despised as much as the rest.
You see," she continued, "a younger brother may not take a mate until all his older brothers have done so, unless the older brother waives his prerogative, which Jubal would not do, knowing that as long as he kept them single they would be all the keener in aiding him to secure a mate.
You practically accused me of aiding Baron von Schoenvorts.
Squires were running hither and thither, or aiding their masters to don armor, lacing helm to hauberk, tying the points of ailette, coude, and rondel; buckling cuisse and jambe to thigh and leg.
I hesitated, recalled his attitude of a few minutes before; and as though he had read my thoughts, he said quickly: "I could not speak to you in the plaza without danger of arousing suspicions which would prevent me aiding you later, for word had gone out that Al-tan had turned against you and would destroy you--this was after Du-seen the Galu arrived.
Then your only fear in aiding me to escape is that your fellow mortals may discover your duplicity?
And behind this cry was Japan, ever urging and aiding the yellow and brown races against the white.